from The Great Debate:

It’s Russia’s turn to learn that stealth warplanes are hard to do

By David Axe
January 20, 2016

axe-top!

Sukhoi T-50 fighter climbing after takeoff, 2011. Creative Commons

After confronting serious technical and economic difficulties, Russia has dramatically cut back its air force program to field its first radar-evading "stealth" fighter jet. By delaying large-scale acquisition of the Sukhoi T-50 fighter, the Kremlin is tacitly acknowledging a truth that the U.S. military learned decades ago -- and that China might also learn in coming years: developing stealth fighters is hard.

from The Great Debate:

U.S. military might already have the data to identify Islamic State leaders

By Aki Peritz
October 15, 2015

An Islamic State militant holds a gun while standing behind what are said to be Ethiopian Christians in Wilayat Fazzan, in this still image from an undated video made available on a social media website

An Islamic State militant holds a gun while standing behind what are said to be Ethiopian Christians in Wilayat Fazzan in a still from an undated video, April 19, 2015. REUTERS/Social Media Website via Reuters TV

from The Great Debate:

Why the U.S. military can’t succeed in training foreign armies

By Lawrence Korb
October 5, 2015

Afghan forces prepare for battle with Taliban on the outskirts of Kunduz city, northern Afghanistan

Afghan forces prepare for battle with Taliban on the outskirts of Kunduz city, northern Afghanistan, June 21, 2015. IREUTERS/Stringer

from The Great Debate:

The best reason for Iran deal? The West will learn where to drop bombs.

By Alexander McCoy and Jacqueline Lopour
September 30, 2015

Ministers and officials pose for a group picture at the United Nations building in Vienna

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, German Foreign Minister Frank Walter Steinmeier, European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Federica Mogherini, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammon, Secretary of State John Kerry and Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz (L to R) pose for a group picture at the United Nations building in Vienna, Austria July 14, 2015. REUTERS/Joe Klamar/Pool

from The Great Debate:

When it comes to war in space, U.S. has the edge

By David Axe
August 10, 2015

axe-top

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the third Mobile User Objective System satellite for the U.S. Navy lifts off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, January 20, 2015 U.S. Navy

from The Great Debate:

Why you’ll always lose with drones alone

By David Axe
July 13, 2015

Handout of the Triton unmanned aircraft system completing its first flight from Northrop Grumman manufacturing facility in Palmdale

The Triton unmanned aircraft system completing its first flight from the Northrop Grumman manufacturing facility in Palmdale, California, May 22, 2013. U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman/Alex Evers/Handout via Reuters

from The Great Debate:

U.S.-funded Afghan police prey on those they’re paid to protect

By Graeme Smith
June 10, 2015

A member of the Afghan local police meets with soldiers from the U.S. Army's 1st Platoon, Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 36th Infantry Regiment at a checkpoint near Combat Outpost Hutal in Maywand District

A member of the Afghan local police meets with soldiers from the U.S. Army in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, January 20, 2013. REUTERS/Andrew Burton

from The Great Debate:

Hostage deaths prove it’s time to rein in ‘signature’ drone strikes

By David Rohde
April 28, 2015

American hostage Warren Weinstein is shown in this image captured from an undated video courtesy of SITE Intelligence Group

American hostage Warren Weinstein is shown in this image captured from an undated video courtesy of SITE Intelligence Group. Reuters/SITE/As-Sahab Media released by SITE Intelligence Group/Handout via Reuters

from The Great Debate:

Why arming U.S. allies can be like sending weapons straight to the enemy

By David Axe
March 25, 2015

A member of the Kurdish peshmerga forces sit with a weapon during an intensive security deployment against Islamic State militants in Makhmur

A member of the Kurdish peshmerga forces sit with a weapon during an intensive security deployment against Islamic State militants in Makhmur, on the outskirts of the province of Nineveh August 7, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

from David Rohde:

Exclusive: U.S. likely to delay planned closure of two Afghanistan bases

By Reuters Staff
March 18, 2015

WASHINGTON | BY ARSHAD MOHAMMED, DAVID ROHDE AND PHIL STEWART

U.S. soldiers from 5-20 infantry Regiment attached to 82nd Airborne walk while on patrol in Zharay district in Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan April 24, 2012. REUTERS/BAZ RATNER

U.S. soldiers from 5-20 infantry Regiment attached to 82nd Airborne walk while on patrol in Zharay district in Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan April 24, 2012.
REUTERS/BAZ RATNER