from Global Investing:

Sanctions bite Russia but some investors are fishing

August 14, 2014

By Andrew Winterbottom

Russian stocks are up today, for the fifth day in a row and at the highest level in two weeks. What's going on? As we wrote  here earlier in the week, foreign investors have been fleeing this market.  However it could be that some of them are starting to put aside concerns about the potential for further sanctions on Moscow and are scouring Russia's stock markets for contrarian buying opportunities.

from Breakingviews:

Line’s $13 bln valuation shows chat app exuberance

July 31, 2014

By Robyn Mak and Una Galani

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

from Breakingviews:

Interpreting Apple/Beats using Andreessenomics

May 12, 2014

By Richard Beales
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Unstructured Finance:

Jim Chanos, bad news bear, urges market prudence

By Jennifer Ablan
December 9, 2013

Prominent short-seller Jim Chanos is probably one of the last true “bad news bears” you will find on Wall Street these days, save for Jim Grant and Nouriel Roubini. Almost everywhere you turn, money managers still are bullish on U.S. equities going into 2014 even after the Standard & Poor’s 500’s 27 percent returns year-to-date and the Nasdaq is back to levels not seen since the height of the dot-com bubble in 1999.

from Global Investing:

Beaten-down emerging equities may not be all that cheap

November 11, 2013

It's generally accepted these days that emerging equities are cheap and that value-focused investors should consider buying. But some disagree  -- analysts at UBS say the alleged cheapness of EM equities rings hollow when you look at the return-on-equity on emerging companies. They don't dispute that the market has de-rated significantly on price-earnings and price-book metrics (at 10.5 times and 1.5 times respectively, they are well below long-term averages). But they argue that these have not been excessive when compared to the decline in profitability.  Emerging return-on-equity pre-crisis was usually higher than developed. Once at a lofty 17 percent, emerging ROE now languishes at 12.7 percent, almost on par with ROE for developed companies. Check out this graphic:

from Global Investing:

Value or growth? The dichotomy of emerging market shares

November 5, 2013

Investors in emerging markets are facing a tough choice. Should one buy cheap shares in the hope that poor corporate governance and profitability will improve some day? Or is it better to close one's eyes and buy into expensively valued companies that sell mobile telephones, holidays and handbags -- all the things high-spending emerging market consumers hanker after?

from Global Investing:

Emerging markets: to buy or not to buy

September 12, 2013

To buy or not to buy -- that's the question facing emerging market investors.

The sector is undoubtedly cheap --  equity valuations are 30-50 percent cheaper than their 10-year average on a price-book basis; currencies have depreciated 15-20 percent in the space of 4 months and local bond yields have surged by an average 150 basis points. As we have pointed out before, cheapness is relative and the slowing economic and credit growth in many countries will undoubtedly manifest itself in falling EPS growth. Companies that cannot pass on high input costs caused by weak currencies, will have to take a further margin squeeze.

from Global Investing:

Wages wag the tail of the DAX

By Reuters Staff
October 5, 2012

This week, Germany celebrated its Tag der deutschen Einheit (Day of German Unity) marking twenty-two years since the wall was torn down between East and West.

from Bethany McLean:

Should Goldman Sachs go out of business?

By Bethany McLean
July 9, 2012

Among those who believe that Goldman is basically the devil’s spawn, there’s of course only one answer to the above question: Yes! But there’s another group that seems to be asking the same question, and that’s investors.

from Global Investing:

Emerging stocks: when will there be gain after pain?

June 14, 2012

Emerging equities' amazing  first quarter rally now seems a distant memory. In fact MSCI's main emerging markets index recently spent 11 straight weeks in the red, the longest lossmaking stretch in the history of the index.  The reasons are clear -- the euro zone is in danger of breakup, growth is dire in the West and stuttering in the East. Weaker oil and metals prices are hitting commodity exporting countries.