from The Great Debate:

Whack-a-mole: A lesson in the unexpected consequences of ‘cleaning up’ politics

By Richard White
November 3, 2014

opinion-skaggs-mahurin_605

I may be the one person who listens to the election news and thinks about Benjamin Harrison. You don’t remember him? President of the United States from 1888-1892? The scion of a political dynasty that yielded enough failed presidencies to make the Harrisons the Bushes of the 19th century? So why do I think of Harrison? Because this is an election year that centers on money.

from Breakingviews:

Twitter free-speech chirps carry overtone of risk

October 9, 2014

By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Counterparties:

MORNING BID – He’s an importer-exporter

September 11, 2014

The stock market has, over time, gotten somewhat more used to the idea that U.S. federal government activities add to market consternation and volatility, not reduce it. In the 1990s, there used to be a catchphrase that “gridlock was good for equities,” but that came during a long period of economic growth and on the back of policies that Wall Street generally supported – financial services reform, welfare reform, and not much else. That’s no longer the case. We’ve already seen the detrimental effects on the markets of the U.S. debt ceiling fiasco that led to the first-ever downgrade of the U.S. credit rating in 2010 and subsequent fights about the debt ceiling (though that has abated somewhat).

from Breakingviews:

Review: Paul Ryan changes delivery but not direction

August 22, 2014

By Stephanie Rogan

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. 

from MacroScope:

Scrambling to flesh out skeleton Fed board

April 25, 2014

"It's about time" was the general reaction when on Thursday the Senate Banking Committee scheduled a vote on Barack Obama's nominees for the Federal Reserve board. Not that Stanley Fischer, Lael Brainard and Jerome Powell (a sitting governor who needs re-confirmation) have been waiting all that long; it was January that the U.S. president nominated them as central bank governors, and only a month ago that the trio testified to the committee. The urgency and even anxiety had more to do with the fact that only four members currently sit on the Fed's seven-member board and one of those, Jeremy Stein, is retiring in a month. The 100-year old Fed has never had only three governors, and the thought of the policy and administrative headaches that would bring was starting to stress people out. After all, the Fed under freshly-minted chair Janet Yellen is in the midst of its most difficult policy reversal ever.

from Jack Shafer:

The landslide of news

By Jack Shafer
March 26, 2014

Of the many ways nature can kill you, the landslide must be the most cruel. Not as cosmically spectacular as the tectonic tantrum of the earthquake or as catastrophic as pure weather-borne calamities (floods, hurricanes, tornados), the mudslide lies in wait like a heart attack, springing its localized force without much, if any, warning. It's filthy, it's bone-crushing, and it's suffocating. Any trust you have in terra firma will promptly be upended.

from Breakingviews:

Obama’s new sanctions aim to expose crony Putinism

March 21, 2014

By Kevin Allison
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from MacroScope:

Cold War chill over Ukraine

By Mike Peacock
February 7, 2014

Dramatic twist in the Ukraine saga last night with a conversation between a State Department official and the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine posted on YouTube which appeared to show the official, Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland, deliberating on the make-up of the next government in Kiev.

from Photographers' Blog:

Marching to Sousa’s drum beat

December 6, 2013

Washington, D.C.

By Jonathan Ernst

One of the great things about Washington is historic Capitol Hill, where there’s a lot of life beyond the headlines and punch lines about the U.S. Congress. I like to describe it as a small town attached to the city. We know our neighbors. We walk our dogs.

from MacroScope:

Humdrum summit

By Mike Peacock
October 24, 2013

A two-day EU summit kicks off in Brussels hamstrung by the lack of a German government.