Archive

Reuters blog archive

from India Insight:

A year after a deadly rape, Delhi women not keen on self-defence classes

Riddhi Mittal took a big professional risk when she moved back to Delhi in September to start her own software company. She did not want her personal safety to be part of the risk, especially considering the gruesome tale of the deadly Delhi gang rape that made headlines around the world one year ago this week.

Mittal, who earned her undergraduate degree and master's degree in computer science at Stanford University in California, and was an intern at Facebook and Microsoft, was apprehensive about returning to the city, now that it was dubbed "India's rape capital," so she signed up for self-defence classes.

“I was here in Delhi in December 2012 for my winter vacation when (the rape) happened. So I was tracking it 24x7 when I was here, and even when I went back to the U.S. in January when my vacations had ended,” said Riddhi, 23, who lives with her parents in South Delhi’s New Friends Colony.

The idea of altering her daily life in a way that forced her to mostly stay indoors to avoid "getting into danger" didn’t appeal to her. She signed up for a course at "Krav Maga India" and started taking classes at the centre's location in the posh Saket suburb.

from India Insight:

A safe city no more: what went wrong in Mumbai

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

An increasingly globalized city that has grown indiscriminately, a metropolis where inequality festers, and an urban sprawl blind to the needs of the poor. Mumbai is where a twentysomething photojournalist was gang-raped by five men this month, shattering perceptions that it is India’s safest city for women.

Sociologists and historians say this was not an isolated incident, and warn of more attacks. They cite a growing class divide and pockets of uneven growth as factors linked to crimes against women, who are often victims of socially sanctioned oppression.

from India Insight:

Interview: Have to ensure women feel safe, says Delhi’s new police chief

(Disclaimer: This interview is website-exclusive and cannot be reproduced in any form without prior permission)

By Aditya Kalra and Sankalp Phartiyal

New Delhi's police force considers women's safety as one of its primary tasks, its new police chief Bhim Sain Bassi said in an interview on Tuesday. Bassi takes over the job on July 31, succeeding Neeraj Kumar who held the post for 13 months.

from India Insight:

Just another rape in India. Are we becoming numb?

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily of Reuters)

A grim parlour game sometimes comes to mind when I read the latest story about someone raping a woman or a child in India. Is this the one that's going to change everything? Is this the one that's going to keep me up for days contributing to the news media's coverage? Or is this just another rape?

from India Insight:

Delhi rape case reignites police reform debate

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily of Reuters)

I live in India’s rape capital where rape cases are as common as power cuts used to be a few years ago. Even reports of police misbehaviour have become routine.

from India Insight:

Interview: Satisfied with response from police, government: rape victim’s father

Five men accused of the rape and murder of the 23-year-old student appeared in court on Monday to hear charges against them.

Reuters’ Shashank Chouhan interviewed the rape victim’s father over telephone. Here are the excerpts:

  •