Ashleigh's Feed
Jun 2, 2011
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Eldercare: How to develop a long-term care plan

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Senior citizens get a bad rap for being cheap. But there’s no way to stick to a low budget when it comes to eldercare: It costs $77,745 annually to live privately in a nursing home. That’s a jump of $17,520 per year compared to 2005, according to the Genworth 2011 Cost of Care Survey, which sees prices continuing to rise.

Navigating your way through the individual-care maze and determining how you will pay for eldercare can be daunting. Wendy Boglioli, Olympic gold medalist and long-term care advocate, is on a mission to help aging populations live the life they’ve always envisioned. She spoke to Reuters about fostering a passion for preparation and developing a long-term plan for successful aging.

May 27, 2011
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Affluent plastic: Are high-end credit cards worth it?

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Competition is heating up in the lucrative high-end credit card market, where annual fees can run into the hundreds, or even thousands, of dollars. Issuers are offering luxury benefits and exclusive rewards programs in an attempt to win the loyalty of affluent consumers.

“Many of the larger card issuers covet high-net worth clients because of their huge charge volume, rather than the typical finance charge revenue they might earn from the masses,” says Ben Woolsey of CreditCards.com. That charge volume can top $20,000 a month, by some estimates. “People with large charge volume generate significant amounts of interchange revenue for the issuer,” he said.

May 4, 2011
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The best credit cards for college grads

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The din of hallowed halls is quieting and as college students reach for their diplomas, they may also be reaching for some new plastic. Grads who have reached the ripe-old-age of 21 are now unencumbered by credit card regulation and free to start building a credit history — and choosing the right card can mean extra rewards.

Cardratings.com has compiled a list of the top credit cards for graduates, depending on your goals after college and the state of your credit history.

Apr 29, 2011
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Women hand over the reins on retirement: survey

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You’ve heard the statistics: More women than ever are involved in household finances, with a quarter of them in control. Working women have surpassed men in attainment of higher education — the first time in history.  And yet, women still pass the buck when it comes to their own retirement security, according to a new survey from ING Direct USA and Dailyworth.com.

    Among those surveyed, nearly 40 percent of married women will leave their retirement planning up to their spouse or significant other Nearly 30 percent say they have no idea what their main source of retirement income will be

More than 1,000 Americans over the age of 18 participated in the phone survey — the majority of women had some form of higher education (63 percent) owned their own home (74 percent) and considered themselves the head of the household (52 percent).

Apr 27, 2011
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From books to homes: Swap your way to big savings

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Sometimes a gift is more like a curse. Self-described “cheap” booklover and avid library user Alyssa Lester wasn’t over the moon when she found a new ereader under the Christmas tree last year. “I love my Kindle, but didn’t want to buy one because I would have to start buying books and I don’t have a lot of extra money in my budget for that,” she says.

While searching online for ebook alternatives, Lester stumbled upon the recently-launched website eBookFling.com, which allows readers to lend Kindle and Nook ebooks for a free, two-week period, acting as a secondary media market for literary lovers.

Apr 20, 2011
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Need a loan? 4 tips to improve your debt health

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You’re young, ready to start a family and make the most significant investment of your life — the purchase of your first home. You’ve saved for a sizable down payment, but have you assessed your debt health?

The Great Recession has driven home the perils of plastic dependency, yet the average credit card debt per household in the U.S. is $14,750, according to CreditCards.com. And, in March alone, there were 144,657 consumer bankruptcy filings, up 41 percent from February’s total of 102,686.

Apr 19, 2011
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Easter hunt: How to save cash as cocoa rises

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Is the money you’ve socked away for Easter treats not stretching as far this year? You’ve likely experienced sticker shock as commodity prices continue to soar, sending the cost of that cavity-inducing chocolate bunny ever higher.

Cocoa futures continue on a wave of volatility thanks to political turmoil in Ivory Coast — the world’s top cocoa exporter. And research from the World Bank shows sugar prices are up 21 percent from last year. But, it’s not just the sweet stuff that’s affected. Instability in Africa and the Middle East has driven overall global food prices up 36 percent over last year, according to the latest edition of the World Bank’s Food Price Watch.

Mar 24, 2011
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Small stars reap big rewards at 2011 Lipper Fund Awards

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Size matters, but bigger isn’t always better when it comes to funds — as evidenced by a number of the 37 trophy winners of the 2011 Lipper Fund Awards.

Funds with an asset base under $500 million were among the top performers in the three-year trophy category, demonstrating the flexibility and agility that’s inherent to smaller funds. With a smaller portfolio, fund managers can pounce on market opportunities and trade in and out of securities with ease.

Mar 18, 2011
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Vodka: Quality without the cost?

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Let’s talk alcohol: After all, it’s 5 p.m. somewhere, right? Over the past decade, the popularity of super-premium spirits has exploded, catering to a new breed of high-end cocktails in many watering holes.

“There has been a significant increase in consumers buying better quality products, almost across the board in all the various categories of spirits,” says Frank Coleman senior vice president of Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS).

Mar 10, 2011
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6 tips for losing weight without losing your wallet

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I used to be fat. Not morbidly obese, but I was tipping the scales at more than 200 pounds, dragging my miserable self to plus-sized lady shops, wishing the label read size six and not size 16. I managed to lose 70 pounds (and keep it off ) through good-ol’ exercise and healthy eating — sans personal trainers, expensive nutrition plans, complicated supplement guides or fad workout regimes. Do I know a thing or two about losing weight and saving money? Yeah, I do.

There is a common misconception that losing weight requires ample amounts of cash; the more nutritious the food is the more it will cost the consumer. Not true, says Bethany Thayer, a registered dietitian and spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

    • About Ashleigh

      "As personal finance producer, Ashleigh aids the team in building personal finance coverage at Reuters.com and other Thomson Reuters platforms. She first joined the Thomson Reuters online desk in 2008 as an editor for Reuters.com, Reuters.ca and Reuters.co.uk."
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