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The sky is falling — or is it?

March 19, 2009

The economic sky might still be falling, but it looks like the folks playing the stock markets have their hard hats on. Either that or they may be on to something. If the recent run of gains for global equities continues, world stocks will mark their best month in a decade. A look at the MSCI’s all-country world stock index shows a gain of 8 percent this month. It has climbed nearly 18 percent over the past eight sessions. It’s enough to make you think someone has opened the gate and let the bull out. But investors are ever-cautious and few are jumping up and down with glee.

What do you think? Is the stock market turning the corner?

Comments

This is a temporary jump. Youtube an economist name Peter Schiff, another named Jim Rogers and you will get the truth about what is going to happen very soon. If that doesn’t convince you try Gerald Celente. The sky really is falling.

Posted by Jeffro | Report as abusive
 

It’s just an illusion. If people buy into it, they would be at fault. You have to convince the country that everything is ok, so they buy your houses and invest in place that look like they could gain ground, then when the time is right everything crashes and you bring thousands of people down with you.

Posted by Luke | Report as abusive
 

The sky has been falling. Now it is on the upswing. Will it stay there. No. Will it go up again. Of course it will. That is what is does. The only consistency about the market is it will go up and down. People tald about 7000 as though it is unheard of but in 1974 it was “OMG we are in a recession the sky is falling” Chicken little are about the place. They were wrong then the were wrong in the 80′s and the 90′s and in 02. People have got to stop freeking out about the market. It will go up this country will go back to work and low and behold the sky will still be up there. Get a grip folks. Quit whining and go invest in our future.

Posted by pengeo | Report as abusive
 

Note to pengeo:Smart investors use back responsible, innovative, HONEST businesses for the long term. You seem to be urging the lemming investors to pour good money after bad, backing the scoundrels on Wall Street who inflated their earnings and flat-out lied about the value of their complex derivatives and exotic securities (all while skimming profits for themselves).One cannot blame the investor for shunning the Wall Street shell game and the corrupt, inbred boards of the largest companies in the world. These fat cats have long been putting their own interests ahead of the investor and the workers.So much the better that the public instead invests its savings with trusted people on Main Street instead.The US economy will not recover until the fly-by-night loan schemes are banned once and for all. From your local corner paycheck loan scammer to the Madoff Ponzi scheme to AIG’s gambling off the books, the whole capitalistic system has slowly rotted to the core. If the system doesn’t reform itself, then the heavy hand ofthe law should. … oh, but wait, who funded our congressmens’ campaigns? Both GOP and Democrat? Well, there you have it. Wall Street placed corrupt puppets in congress too. Looks like the American public will have to look after themselves. Sure was an expensive lesson, trusting Wall Street.

Posted by Mike | Report as abusive
 

Sky is falling.Been falling for 35 years.Been doing a great job hiding it behind repeated bubbles.

Posted by allison | Report as abusive
 

I do not believe the market is turning the corner yet. But it will after more heavy inflation/deflation regulation, globalization, and manipulation. The markets have been in decline since 1913 in my opinion.

Posted by jason | Report as abusive
 

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