Barry's Feed
Dec 20, 2012

Troops gone, U.S. increasingly sidelined in Iraq

BAGHDAD/WASHINGTON, Dec 20 (Reuters) – When a group of
Americans and their heavily armed guards arrived at the Turkish
embassy for a party in September, Iraqi police outside blocked
their path.

Unless they surrendered the weapons held by their security
detail in accordance with embassy policy, the Iraqis said, the
delegation of U.S. diplomats would not be allowed in.

May 15, 2012

“Closed” Iraq torture jail still open – rights group

BAGHDAD (Reuters) – Human Rights Watch said on Tuesday Iraqi authorities were still running a jail they said had been shut over a year ago after reports of prisoners being beaten and electrocuted, but the government denied this, saying the site was empty.

The New York-based watchdog and other critics of the administration of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki accuse it of pushing Iraq back towards authoritarianism by cracking down on protests, harassing opponents and torturing detainees.

Apr 23, 2012

Iraq summons Turkish envoy over Erdogan broadside

BAGHDAD, April 23 (Reuters) – Iraq, locked in a public row
with neighbouring Turkey, has summoned Ankara’s ambassador in
Baghdad to protest at critical remarks by Turkish Prime Minister
Tayyip Erdogan, the foreign ministry said on Monday.

The envoy, Younis Demerer, heard the Iraqi complaint on
Sunday after several days of charge and counter-charge.

Apr 21, 2012

Iraq calls Turkey “hostile state” as relations dim

BAGHDAD (Reuters) – Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki on Friday branded Turkey a “hostile state” with a sectarian agenda, the latest in a series of bitter exchanges between the neighbors.

Maliki was responding to comments made by Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan on Thursday in which Erdogan accused the Iraqi leader of fanning tensions between the country’s Shi’ites, Sunnis and Kurds with his “self-centered” ways.

Dec 28, 2011

Troubled Ethiopia-Somalia history haunts Horn of Africa

NAIROBI (Reuters) – Five hundred years ago, an Imam who ruled much of what is now Somalia, led a daring invasion of Christian Ethiopia, looting monasteries, burning down churches and slaying all who resisted.

Centuries on, memories of Imam Ahmad Gragn still haunt both countries, and echoes of that long and bloody history still ripple across the Horn of Africa region which considers Somalia the greatest threat to its stability.

Nov 11, 2011

Insight: Africa to miss Gaddafi’s money, not his meddling

TRIPOLI (Reuters) – Muammar Gaddafi plucked some fluff from his flowing golden robes, poured himself another steaming cup of tea and continued with his lecture, not seeming to notice the wide yawns around him. It was 2 a.m. Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe was dozing in a corner.

The leaders’ rigid stares and sour faces at an African Union summit in 2009, witnessed by journalists peering through a gap in the curtains, showed how most African leaders felt about the continent’s self-styled “King of Kings.” “There goes the sideshow clown,” one African diplomat muttered, as Gaddafi swept out of the room and told the waiting journalists to get some sleep.

Nov 3, 2011

Libyans want jobs from “grey men” of government

TRIPOLI (Reuters) – Jobs, normality and democracy are high on the wish lists of Libyans questioned on the streets of their capital, but after months of civil war, meeting their expectations is a challenging assignment for the “grey men” now trying to run the country.

Few know anything about their new interim prime minister, Abdurrahim El-Keib, who before his surprise appointment to the most difficult job in post-Gaddafi Libya was an academic and electrical engineer.

Nov 1, 2011

Libya’s NTC struggles to stay the “good guys”

TRIPOLI (Reuters) – Having picked a new prime minister, Libya’s fractious interim ruling council must now restore its own credibility, dented by unseemly haggling over Muammar Gaddafi’s rotting remains.

The nature of the man’s death – insulted, battered and abused before being shot dead – has done some damage to its standing, with many observers asking themselves, just who are the men who have replaced him?

Nov 1, 2011

Analysis: Libya’s NTC struggles to stay the “good guys”

TRIPOLI (Reuters) – Having picked a new prime minister, Libya’s fractious interim ruling council must now restore its own credibility, dented by unseemly haggling over Muammar Gaddafi’s rotting remains.

The nature of the man’s death – insulted, battered and abused before being shot dead – has done some damage to its standing, with many observers asking themselves, just who are the men who have replaced him?

Oct 31, 2011

Gaddafi son should be tried in Libya first: minister

TRIPOLI (Reuters) – Saif al-Islam Gaddafi will not escape justice and should be tried in Libya for murder, corruption and “many things” before an international court questions him, the country’s interim justice minister said on Monday.

Mohammed al-Alagi said he did not want Saif al-Islam, now on the run, to meet the same fate as his father, former leader Muammar Gaddafi, who was beaten, abused and shot after forces of Libya’s National Transitional Council captured him on October 20.

    • About Barry

      "Irish journalist who has lived in the Horn and east Africa since 2006 - first in Ethiopia, then in Uganda - covering politics, elections, society, culture and economics across the region. I have also worked for Reuters in Tunisia, Iraq and Libya and was part of the team that dominated coverage of Muammar Gaddafi's killing. Always welcome a good chat over on Twitter: @malonebarry"
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