Who is the superpower, America or Israel?

By Bernd Debusmann
February 21, 2011

On February 18, the United States vetoed a U.N. Security Council resolution on Israeli settlements in occupied Palestinian territories. The vote raises a question: Who dominates in the alliance between America and Israel?

Judging from the extent to which one partner defies the will of the other, decade after decade, the world’s only superpower is the weaker partner. When push comes to shove, American presidents tend to bow to Israeli wishes. Barack Obama is no exception, or he would not have instructed his ambassador at the United Nations to vote against a policy he himself stated clearly in the summer of 2009.

“The United States does not accept the legitimacy of continued Israeli settlements. This construction violates previous agreements and undermines efforts to achieve peace. It is time for these settlements to stop,” he said in a much-lauded speech in Cairo.

Compare this with the text of the resolution that drew 14 votes in favor and died with the U.S. veto: “Israeli settlements established in the Palestinian Territory occupied since 1967, including East Jerusalem, are illegal and constitute a major obstacle to the achievement of a just, lasting and comprehensive peace.”

Linguists may quibble over the difference between “illegal” and “illegitimate” but the substance of the two statements is pretty much the same. So why the veto? It followed an energetic campaign by the Israeli government and its allies in the United States to keep the issue out of the United Nations, seen by Israel as a reflexively anti-Israeli body.

Washington’s ambassador at the U.N., Susan Rice, had a different explanation. Though the U.S. opposed settlements, she said, adopting that resolution would have risked hardening the positions of both sides in future negotiations. In other words, let’s return to the parallel universe of the “peace process.”

In that universe, American presidents make optimistic predictions detached from the realities on the ground. George W. Bush, early in 2009: “The peace agreement should happen and can happen by the end of the year.” Obama, last September, held out the prospect of an agreement that would, by next year,” lead to a new member of the United Nations – an independent state of Palestine, living in peace with Israel.”

While the peace process has sputtered on, Israel has been building settlements in the territory of what would be a Palestinian state. Demands from nine successive U.S. administrations that these settlements – illegal under the Fourth Geneva convention – be stopped have been ignored.

Since the peace process began with the Oslo accord of 1993, the number of Israeli settlers in the occupied West Bank has risen from around 110,000 to more than 300,000. The government of Prime Minister Benyamin Netanyahu refused to agree even to the extension of a temporary halt, despite an offer of jet fighters worth billion of dollars. American aid has been running at around $8.5 million a day for many years but obviously doesn’t buy much influence.

The number of optimists who still believe in the “two-state solution” – an independent Palestinian state alongside Israel – has been shrinking as the number of settlements grew. The peace process ground to a halt when the Palestinians refused to negotiate as long as there was no halt to settlements.

The problem with America’s role in the process (highlighted again by the February 18 veto) was spelt out with memorable clarity six years ago by Aaron David Miller, who worked in senior roles at the State Department for 25 years as a Middle East negotiator and adviser on Arab-Israeli affairs.

AMERICANS AS ISRAEL’S LAWYERS, NOT HONEST BROKERS

“For far too long,” he wrote in an opinion piece in the Washington Post, “many American officials involved in Arab-Israeli peace-making have acted as Israel’s attorney, catering for and coordinating with the Israelis at the expense of successful peace negotiations. If the United States wants to be an honest and effective broker…then surely it can have only one client: the pursuit of a solution that meets the requirements of both sides.”

The obstacles to this are numerous and difficult, from a weak Palestinian leadership that does not represent all Palestinians to fractious Israeli politics that have moved farther and farther to the right and are now dominated by a government whose foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman, is a settler himself.

But perhaps the most difficult obstacle to American peace-making lies in the United States – the “Israel, right or wrong” crowd and its pervasive influence in Congress. That the Middle East policy decks would be stacked against the Palestinians became clear even before the creation of Israel in 1948.

When President Harry Truman and his top diplomats in the Middle East discussed plans for the partition of Palestine in 1945, the experts warned against it and predicted it would result in foreign policy problems for the U.S. His answer: “I’m sorry, gentlemen, but I have to answer to hundreds of thousands who are anxious for the success of Zionism. I don’t have hundreds of thousands of Arabs among my constituents.”

No annual meeting of the American Israeli Public Affairs Committee is complete without a senior member of the administration (Democratic or Republican) reminding the audience of the “unbreakable bond” between the U.S. and Israel, as evidenced by the fact that Truman recognized the state of Israel just 11 minutes after its declaration of independence. (His calculation about constituents is not part of the homage.)

So, if the peace process is really dead, as many experts now say, what’s next? At the end of the 2007 Annapolis conference, one of a long string of peace summits that produced photo opportunities but no progress, then Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert had this to say: “If the day comes when the two-state solution collapses, and we face a South African-like struggle for equal voting rights…the State of Israel is finished.

“The Jewish organizations, which were our power base in America, will be the first to come out against us because they will say they cannot support a state that does not support democracy and equal voting rights for all its residents.”

That rings even more true now, when Israel’s Arab neighbors are ousting their dictators in mass movements for democracy, than it did then.

(You can contact the author at Debusmann@Reuters.com)

40 comments

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I’m a disgusted American who is very ashamed of my government right now. I”m sick of our government giving Israel 30 billion of tax payer dollars and Israel being greedy as they are, accepting with open hands.

Our country is lost.

Posted by uscitizen123 | Report as abusive

Who is the superpower, America or Israel? | Analysis & Opinion |…

Here at World Spinner we are debating the same thing……

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Dear Mr. Bebusmann,

Great article, i hope your fate after writing this article is not the same as Helen Thomas. I agree with everthing you have stated. Thanks

Posted by AnAmereican | Report as abusive

What is the problem? Didnt Hollywood brainwash everyone to believe that This is My Land God Gave This Land To me? Say one word against that and watch out for howls of anti hebrewish sentiment. I personally admire the race. They gave us the first commercial brands of beer, Isrealite, and Hebrew.

Posted by Apoypto | Report as abusive

Thank you for your courage .. I hope they won’t silence your pen… and handcuff your thoughts…. I pray this article does not send you to the unemployment office.
Liberty & Justice 4 all ….

Posted by FreeFpalestine | Report as abusive

This article is exactly what needs to be read. Thanks, Bernd.

Posted by bossmeh19 | Report as abusive

US aid to Israel in 2008 was 2.5 Billion nor 30 billion.

Posted by Anonymous | Report as abusive

Absolutely impressive comment. This is what I call professional Journalism. The only way to resolve this tragedy is by non-biased journalism as that of Bernd Debusmann .

Posted by Limelight | Report as abusive

Anonymous: For the next five years, aid will run at $3.09 billion a year. For the full picture, see:

http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/mideast/RL332 22.pdf

Posted by Komment | Report as abusive

“Our country is lost.”

Exactly, and not just on this issue.

Economically as well, the U.S. is doomed.

It’s not if, but when. Look at what’s happening in Wisconsin. Similar stuff will spring up in other states at later times. Watch the news.

If Obama Inc. can’t fix Israel, how can they fix the great U.S. OF A.

GOD BLESS.

Posted by doctorjay317 | Report as abusive

Once again, the U.S. does not care about “wrong” and “right”. What “right” does anyone have to take another person’s property and make it their own through “brute force”. The U.S. is more concerned with the “Israel” lobby money than “justice”.

It would be nice if our Pro-Israel Senators, Congressman, and President took an oath of loyalty to the U.S. because it is becoming skeptical who their loyalty is with. Just go the websites of AIPAC, JINSA, JTA, and Opensecrets.org to see the campaign financing.

FOLLOW THE MONEY!

Posted by alethean | Report as abusive

While the question is important, it’s long been answered; Israel calls the shots, the tail wagging the dog. But then, this has always been common knowledge. The more disturbing part of the question, which one is the superpower? Neither. The US is a has been on the world stage, and Israel is a trouble making parasite. China comes close to being a superpower but will probably self destruct at some point, as all brutal dictatorships must.

Posted by drrealitycheck | Report as abusive

Good points are made, but perhaps the author could peer just a bit farther over the horizon than what was offered in the final sentence. If the people of the Arab and Muslim world finally achieve genuine democratic institutions without succumbing to any Islamist temptations, perhaps the US will not need to lean on Israel so much. Perhaps we will have more than one genuine ally in the region. That will inevitably reduce Israel’s influence over US policy.

Posted by mheld45 | Report as abusive

is it any wonder America is now viewed by many countries the world over as being full blown supporters of the Israel State ? How can you expect true democracy when you deny rightful complaints against Israel ? The US is becoming a pariah state. Time to be more honest and open instead of supporting regimes who are acting illegally in the Worlds opinion

Posted by robinyates | Report as abusive

Once again, the U.S. does not care about “wrong” and “right”. What “right” does anyone have to take another person’s property and make it their own through “brute force”. The U.S. is more concerned with the “Israel” lobby money than “justice”.

Posted by alethean | Report as abusive

Here is the news. The state of Israel is finished. The paper mache bulwark that Wall Street and the USA built around Israel is beginning to unravel and rightfully so. The Egyptians have not been fed a load of misinformation about Israel’s brutality toward their Palestinian neighbors because they can see it with their own eyes.

Posted by arcoknuti | Report as abusive

If Israel wants to survive the peace process better not be dead. It had better begin in earnest for the first time. The mask is off the lights are on and your true intentions are there for all to see. Better get real quick thou son of Abraham.

Posted by arcoknuti | Report as abusive

Brilliantly said, you are truly an inspirational writer, and I hope you continue writing like this on behalf of others who believe in free press.
I hope you don’t mind if I quote your words (with a link to this blog of course) on my own site.

Based on many writers like yourself, I have written an article about the origins of the Middle East crisis. I hope you can take the time to read it.

http://hubofmiddleeastpolitics.blogspot. com/2011/02/origins-of-middle-east-crisi s.html

Thank you again for your insight.

Adel.

Posted by adelhelal | Report as abusive

Reuters and Mr. Debusmann … thank you for youe courage

Posted by hopeful12 | Report as abusive

Reuters and Mr Debusmann…thank you for your courage

Posted by hopeful12 | Report as abusive

Its all about the oil folks. If oil were worthless, which I hope it will be very soon, Israel would no longer matter to us, nor would the rest of the Middle East. The best thing we can all do for our country and for the world is to get off of fossil fuel addiction. Its the only answer, and it is THE answer. I use less than a tank of gas per month, and have for years. If everyone did the same, the Middle Eastern countries could not support their dictatorships, and democracies with economic opportunity would begin to rise.

Posted by lhathaway | Report as abusive

Dear Mr Dumbassman,

Well as we read this report, scores of innocent civilians being murdered in your Libiya. Not a word of opinion on mide-east dictatorship from your Reuters?
If indeed the Jews / Israelis have achieved building a fantastic relationship with the US or Europe and building a wonderfull country–GOOD FOR THEM–THEY ACHIEVED IT WITH FARE COMPETITION.

Posted by IslamFlair | Report as abusive

I have never been so ashamed to call myself American as when having to witness my President and Secretary of State
literally kiss the backside of Israel.
R.Graham Thank you Mr. Debusmann for your article: Who is the Superpower, America or Israel?

Posted by R.Graham | Report as abusive

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Who is the superpower, America or Israel? | Analysis & Opinion |…

Its no surprise that the US supports Israel over an islamic state. The muslim and Arab world is afright with wars and rumors of wars. The whole middle east is rife with conflict. Muslim extremists (I know, not mainstream) have terrorized the world through bombings and conflict, and by sad association, the Palestinians are grouped in the association. Even our closest Muslim ally states (Turkey and Egypt and Saudi Arabia) have recently shown a break from toleration of the United States. With such volatility and hatred coming from the Islamic states toward the United States, its not a matter of “following the money” or “buying votes” but more a matter of following the stability. The Egyptian president recently told America to back out of his affairs and said that we don’t understand the Arab mind, that negotiation and giving a compromise is a sign of weakness, that is then exploited. I think a paradigm shift in understanding their heritage, teaching, and religion is required.

Posted by jareed | Report as abusive

[...] More → Blog this! Bookmark on Delicious Recommend on Facebook Share on Linkedin Share via MySpace Share with Stumblers Share on technorati Tweet about it Subscribe to the comments on this post Tell a friend   2011/02/23 at 6:02am | This entry was posted in Politics, Via Digg and tagged israel, reuters.com. Bookmark the permalink. ← BBC News – Lehman Brothers $11bn case against Barclays fails [...]

Bernd Debusmann | Analysis & Opinion | Reuters.com…

Here at World Spinner we are debating the same thing……

I agree that the future will be a real chalange for Israel unless it figures out a way to leave Judea & Samaria while maintaining its security.
However the real problem is that the Arab/Muslim world is not really interested in a Palestinian state and will not be satisfied with or agree to Israel within any borders.

It also needs to be remembered by American citizens and tax payers, that most of the aid to Israel must be spent in America, by law. In other words, it is a way to spend money in America, and to keep Americans working.
Yoram Getzler
Moshav Aminadav, Jerusalem

Posted by yoram | Report as abusive

Reading your article and the following comments I can’t help but come to one conclusion: what a bunch of snivelling, appeasing cowards. You all think that if we’re nice to Hamas, Fatah, al Qaeda and the Muslim Brotherhood, all your problems will go away. Pull your collective heads out of the sand. You all know that if the world weren’t filled with the hatred spewed by the Koran, there wouldn’t be a need for peace negotiations. Everywhere on earth where Muslims are the majority there is civil discord, violence, death and destruction. The disappearance of Israel won’t change that. Only a major editing of their bible will.

Posted by CaptRichie | Report as abusive

Yeah, Capt, all Muslims are bad guys. That doesn’t excuse or justify the US being the toady for Israel. Those two tribes have been sniping at each other since before recorded history. Let them go at it; the US needs to get out of its subservient role now. Right now.
There isn’t a chance in hell of that happening.

Posted by the_Gaul | Report as abusive

America, Israel and the American taxpayers are performing a ‘menage a trois’ and the American taxpayers are getting it socked to them from both ends.

Posted by Brodajo | Report as abusive

Anti-Semites are those who hate Jews more than the Jews deserve-that’s one of the definitions.You,Mr.Debusmann one of those guys.Americans (like the others) never help any one without having certain interest in their mind.They help the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt years ago to sabotage the Soviet influence in there.So they did in Afghanistan back in 1980-s.Things changed,former allies became the enemies.
The major problem of all Arab countries is Feudalism and Islam and that’s what prevents them from going on a dissent development path.
So-called Palestinians (the nation which never existed before Israel came along) make good money out of their conflict with Israel.They are doing pretty well in Judea and Samaria,unlike their brothers in the other Arab countries.
Yet,for some reason The Arabs from Judea and Samaria often try to merry the Israeli Arabs in a matter to obtain the Israeli citizenship.They cry out to the world how much they hate the occupants and at the same time they want to live in Israel?
The “Palestinian territory” was occupied by Jordanians before they(and the other Arab countries) lost the war with Israel in 1967.Part of those Arabs who lived in Judea and Samaria escaped to Jordan during that war and now they form about 70% of the Jordanian population.Yet,when their”Palestinian brothers” looking to escape Libya now days they don’t want them in Jordan.
“Palestinian” Arabs need the conflict- they would become nobody without it.
Israel is not a perfect country.It encounters lots of problems inside and out.But is not the evil creature that sucks an American taxpayer money in.
People’s greed and selfishness does.

Posted by dontbestupied | Report as abusive

Details might be wrong here, but The Road Map to Peace was worked out in Norway in about 1995. The situation has changed by Israeli-creep ever since and it has long been fatuous to think it could continue to have meaning, if indeed it ever had.
Not just US taxpayers, but tax payers throughout the world have sent masses to Israel over the years and the fundamental Jewish philosophy (I can’t remember the word for it) of Justice with Generosity has never ever been glimpsed.
A generous concession would have avoided a world situation now dominated by the example of al Quaeda as well unbelievable burning of resources.
Israeli intransigence, tunnel vision, has so much to answer for, yet the brain-washing of their generations leaves them blind to everything outside their immediate patch.
I hope the Arabs don’t get into a Civil War in various States, otherwise, it will be divide and rule. If a truly Democratic group of States arose, we could have peace at last. A single voice would determine the shape of Israel in years to come.

Posted by seymourfroggs | Report as abusive

When the countries that vote in the UN give back the territories they took, stole, ransacked from other nations, when the US gives back the land it took from the American Indians, then, they can say to Israel, give back the land you won in the wars in which you were attacked. Land for Peace doesn’t work. That has been proved time and time again.

A story: when Sharon and Arafat were discussing peace. Sharon said to Arafat, Before we start, let me tell you the story of Moses. When Moses took the Jews out of Egypt heading for the promised land. When , almost there, the people asked Moses if they could cool down in the fresh lake they were near. Moses agreed. Moses decided to go off in a secluded cove and bathed for a while. When he was done, he went to get dressed. He saw his clothes were gone.
Who Stole my clothes? he cried. A voice from the distance said ” The Palestinians took them.”

At that point, Arafat stood up and yelled, “Wait just a minute, There were no Palestinans back then”

Aha! said Sharon, Now we can start the meeting….

Posted by gpsman | Report as abusive

What reasonable or rational person can ever accept the claim that “God” gives real estate to his supposed “favorites”? Hitler could have been a devoted reader of the Old Testament and still managed to have done what his regime did. He could have used one of those old mad men – Jonathan for example – as his patron saint.

And at dontbestupid – don’t be stupid! Intermarriage between Arabs and Jews would be the ideal situation to end the impasses. BTW – has anyone done DNA testing comparing the Palestinian genetic origins with the Israeli’s? The Romans could not possibly have emptied the country of Judea of all its inhabitants. For one thing – it would have been very difficult to capture them all. The territory remained inhabited after the sack of Jerusalem and no doubt many of those inhabitants were Jews. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if it was discovered that the Palestinians carry genetic traces of the Jews that were left behind plus other traces of later arrivals. But that would probably be true for both sides of that wall. But I really have no idea if genetic DNA testing can be that accurate for such a short interval of time. A friend of mine had his DNA analyzed and you could see the results agreed with movements of peoples as described in the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon. So, maybe so? He was from S. America but had European ancestry.

Adel’s blog is worth the read. I never heard those quotes before. They are not the sorts of comments one ever sees in the news. They are definitely comments that the modern state of Israel would not want too well know to the more general public.

The 1950 British white paper available on the UN site also warned of the problems the partitioning of Palestine would create. You’d think those men were clairvoyant. And it was not anti-Semitic. Their eyes were wide open and one can even call their analysis “compassionate” of a sort. They fully understood why the Jews wanted a homeland but they knew what it would cost the existing population, both Arab and Jewish.

Good article.

Posted by paintcan | Report as abusive

I agree with your observations but would like to see an analysis on the effects of the Palestinian Papers. My feeling is that none of the current US policies speak to the majority Americans polled on issues, so if they are treated as irrelevant but are still expected to pay for everything, would a tax movement/revolt finally cause changes in Washington? Looking forward to your response. Thank and TC.

Posted by Margbb | Report as abusive

Imagine in the current time if France would want to create its own state in Michigan and separate it from the U.S. French are a minority in Michigan so democratic vote on the separation would not work because they would be outvoted by the rest of the Americans living in Michigan. So imagine if they had a historic opportunity when the U.S. is at its weakest and militarily occupy a part of Michigan and impose a regime where only French can vote and all the others who lived there cannot. Furthermore, the occupiers rename the occupied part of Michigan as the “French State” where not only that Americans are not welcome, but they are systematically expelled over time creating huge refugee camps in nearby states of Indiana and Ohio. Imagine then that at that point in history the artificial organization called the United Nations is full of French supporters and somehow that makes the occupation “legal” and Americans who fight for their homes in the occupied part of Michigan are labeled as terrorists. The occupation is a part of a careful log-term plan (i.e. Zionism) of acquiring land by French, so literally days after the occupation is implemented (what a coordinated plan!) the occupiers import millions of other French from all over the world to increase their population in Michigan from around 100,000 to over 5 Million in a short period. Then Americans resist and fight to regain the occupied part of Michigan, but Russia steps in, sends weapons, cash, and everything else the occupiers need to sustain the occupation.

What do you think all of us Americans would feel? We would hate French first, and then all of their supporters (Russia in this analogy) that make the occupation of our land possible. Still questioning yourself why people in the Middle East and other parts of the world do not like us? Because our Zionist controlled government, not the people, supported the very exact scenario as described above against our will and with our tax money making us accomplices in this unspeakable crime. The scenario that would outrage all of us Americans and make us fight against it if it happened in Michigan or anywhere else in the U.S.

This comment is not intended to make derogatory remarks about France and Russia. It is merely used as an example of how Americans would be outraged and fight back in the same situation as the forced establishment of the Zionist regime and its occupation of Palestine.
Urge your state representatives and senators to immediately stop any remaining support for the Zionist regime. Much of the support already stopped because of the increasing pressure on this issue, but we Americans need to completely distance ourselves from this oppressive regime and start actively opposing it.

It appears that sharing and reposting others’ comments is becoming a trend. You can definitely copy, repost, or email mine to anyone including lobbying senators, state representatives and any other public officials who shape our country’s foreign policies.

Posted by CavernMass | Report as abusive

I’m a jewish american, i support the positions in your article completely, have done so for a long time, actively, and will continue to do so. I support an immediate end to US aid to Israel, and a one state solution based on democratic principles and respect for human rights of all people.
I must say that i feel an increasing sense of despair: the ignorance expressed by the blog entries both in support as well as opposition to your article is so pervasive, that one wonders if ‘a just solution’ is even possible under such conditions…

cavem: yes, Israel is exactly like if france took over wisconsin. with one tiny difference: there’s no ‘france’: so, yeah: great metaphor: if france were a theological/nation whose people had been a demonized minority for 1500 years, and if most of the french people outside of wisconsin had been murdered within living memory. and if there were millenia old ‘french’ communities in ‘wisconsin’. Isn’t it possible to support the just aspirations of the palestinian people without denying the history, sensibilities, and reasonable concerns of Jews?

and gpsman- when you use US treatment of native americans as a rationalization for Israeli behaviour towards Palestinians- are you ignorant of the fact the this same history inspired hitler, or just unconcerned? also- exactly what do ancient historical claims ‘prove’? No one other than native americans lived here 500 years ago, but we feel this to be ‘our country’: do you expect palestinians to feel differently?
i fear the banality of this ‘discourse’ (referring here to many of the postings, not your article) more than i fear any other factor in the situation. the banality of evil has tended to be bad for my peeps, even though, apparently, we’re far from immune ourselves,

Posted by banalityofevil | Report as abusive

Love your guts Mr. Bernd Debusmann! Your topics are always right on the money, and delve into issues that are never to be spoken about! You should have a medal of valor for your courageous and insightful journalism.

Posted by schmetterling | Report as abusive

Thank you Mr. Debusmann.

I am a red blooded tax paying American, and not above reproach. Blessed none the less. Faith good people is what will bring us out of the abyss and into the promiss land. It pleases me to see tax dollars doing good in the world. America supports so many nations in this world only to be hated and treated with bad intent and ill will.GOD bless Israel and all nations who have the faith to offer support to this little nation. Let us not forget that there are those who wish very bad things to those who do not conform. Just ask them that are under the foot of such opression and hate, those who are not allowed hope let alone freedom.

Posted by Sernadon | Report as abusive

How do Israelis view the “Wall of Hate” as depicted in the following documentary: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPpkCf663 7E…

I completely understand where you are coming from, and your view of Arthur’s comments are in tune with my experiences. So rather than frustrate myself trying to make sence of anything he has to say, I have moved on. He is clearly trying to dilute your…

How do Israelis view the “Wall of Hate” as depicted in the following documentary: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPpkCf663 7E…

I completely understand where you are coming from, and your view of Arthur’s comments are in tune with my experiences. So rather than frustrate myself trying to reason with a right-wing extremist, I have moved on. He is clearly trying to dilute your r…

I really loved the Lawyer analogy; it fits. But nothing will change. Hillary is still owned by the NYC crowd, and is beholden to AIPAC. Obama needs all the domestic friends he can get, including and especially the NYC crowd. The GOP can’t antagonize its religious conservatives.

It’s not that the Israelis play good Real Politik, it’s that we play it very poorly. They haven’t had a Talleyrand in a long time, and Liberman (both ours and theirs, but in this reference theirs) is simply a corrupt old pol. Really, the problems with the U.S./Israel thing expose the real dangers of democracy. This is like some historical reading of debate in Athens.

Posted by ARJTurgot2 | Report as abusive

Well said Debusmann. By proxy, the Jews rule the Middle East and America through powerful lobby groups. The Jewish lobby groups and the past seven U.S. administrations are near total-complicit in the annexation, colonization, and cleansing programs in Palestine’s West Bank. The criticism that comes from the White House from time to time — to appease the sheeplings (electorate) is to remain symbolic, suggest White House officials following Joe Biden’s visit in 2010. Despite the fact that it was total humiliation by the Israeli government during Biden’s visit, when another 1600 settlements were announced.

American hegemony has been directed at doing Israel’s dirty deeds for the last four decades, and will remain that way. This parasitic leech needs to be taken off the IV for good.

Posted by Randip | Report as abusive

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While I do not recognize any Jewish claims to the land of Palestine, past or present, it is futile not to recognize that after 60 years plus of colonization there are generations of European Jews who are now born in Palestine and know of no other country to return to as former citizens. There parents or grandparents could, but they cannot. Thus, provided that the “Jewish State” bigotry is dropped and no further influx of foreign-born Jews is allowed (because they are foreigners and not because they are Jews, as in any normal state in the world), I fully support the one state solution and letting the current inhabitants gradually work it out democratically. All talk of other solution is unattainable. It is simply not possible because of economy, land area, or just because of the facts Israel has created on the ground.

Posted by AhmedKhalil | Report as abusive

While I do not recognize any Jewish claims to the land of Palestine, past or present, it is futile not to recognize that after 60 years plus of colonization there are generations of European Jews who are now born in Palestine and know of no other country to return to as former citizens. Their parents or grandparents could, but they cannot. Thus, provided that the “Jewish State” bigotry is dropped and no further influx of foreign-born Jews is allowed (because they are foreigners and not because they are Jews, as in any normal state in the world), I fully support the one state solution and letting the current inhabitants gradually work it out democratically. All talk of other solution is unattainable. It is simply not possible because of economy, land area, or just because of the facts Israel has created on the ground.

Posted by AhmedKhalil | Report as abusive

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