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Consumer Electronics Show starts in Las Vegas

January 7, 2007

tv in mini firetruck.JPGMore than 140,000 people, over 2,000 companies and the one million taxi cabs needed to get them around (ok, it only seems like one million) are gearing up for the start of the annual International Consumer Electronics Show, which gets going on Sunday in Las Vegas.******The show will showcase the fact that the battle for control of living room entertainment is spilling out onto the streets, as consumers increasingly demand that their music, television shows and photographs be portable.******CES, which officially starts on Monday, has a press day on Sunday, including an address Michael and Madonna (impersonators) at CESfrom Microsoft’s Bill Gates. The show will feature everything from bigger and brighter high-definition TVs to tiny devices that shift video from the Internet to your TV. There will be lamps that double as wireless audio speakers, TVs shaped like mini-fire engines, and giant hard drives.******Journalists got a sneak peek at the goods at an unveiling event on Saturday. Perhaps more importantly, Michael Jackson was there. Sort of.******Reuters reporters will be on the ground covering new developments and speeches from tech and media luminaries Dell Chairman Michael Dell, Disney CEO Bob Iger and Nokia CEO Olli-Pekka Kallasvuo. You can find our coverage on Reuters.com and more on the Reuters MediaFile blog through the week.****** 

Comments

Michael Jackson was there? Care to explain? As a gadget? An electronic devise made by him being promoted by Sony or something?

Posted by aveeno | Report as abusive
 

yeah, what do you mean he was there? That doesn’t look like him….it looks like a model.

Posted by leo | Report as abusive
 

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