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Gaza photo…

I read an article about the current infighting in Gaza, concerning an attack on the Palestinian prime minister’s home. A Reuters picture was used as an illustration showing a damaged room with an aide to Haniyeh and a picture of Yassin in the background.

The same photographer also took a picture used by a Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten, showing the same room and the same aide to Haniyeh. However, the two photos show an interesting discrepancy. On the Reuters picture a photo of Sheikh Yassin hangs on the wall, while in Afenposten’s picture a photo of Haniyeh himself hangs on the wall.

Apparently, while the Reuters photographer was present, these pictures were changed. Is this an indication other cosmetic changes having taken place? Are these pictures taken on the spot as they were, or are they in fact carefully arranged?

Georg R. 

reuters400.jpg

aftenposten400.jpg

Photographers from Reuters and other news organizations were at the house taking pictures when one of Haniyeh’s sons decided he wanted a picture of his father on the wall, so he put it up in place of the one of Sheikh Yassin, in mid-photo shoot. We did not censor our shots by, for example, only using the pictures with Haniyeh’s photo in them, and we can’t very well stop people from rearranging their homes as they see fit.¬†Indeed, both of those photos went out, side by side, to our photo clients: GBU Editor

Comments

Editor,

Thank you for the explanation on how things like this happen. At what point does Reuters look at the evidence presented by its photographers, and declare that due to manipulation of the scene, that it would be best not to transmit the photographs to clients? After all, if the background of these images has been tampered with, how can you verify for certain that nothing else has been?

Most Respectfully,
Brian/snapped shot

 

That’s actually funny. “Hey, we should get Dad’s picture out! Reuters is here!”

I wonder if Haniyeh’s wife or the son’s wife appreciated his redecorating. In the homes of most of the Muslims I know in Canada, the home is the woman’s business, and the man redecorates, etc. at his own peril.

Posted by Charlene | Report as abusive
 

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