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Jul 5, 2010

Louis Gossett details career marred by racism and drugs

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – He was not born on the fourth of July, but Louis Gossett, Jr. celebrates it like his birthday, nonetheless.

Not because July 4 is America’s Independence Day. Rather, because it marks the Oscar-winning actor’s own independence from years of living in a haze of freebase cocaine, alcohol and a toxic mold that invaded his house and his body.

Jul 2, 2010

Romantic movies? Not Helen Mirren’s cup of tea

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – “Twilight” is likely not very high on Helen Mirren’s movie list. Because, when it comes to romance on film, the Oscar winner just doesn’t like it.

In that way, Mirren said, she feels more like a man.

“I don’t really like romantic movies very much…And I hate talking about feelings, so I’m definitely a man in disguise,” Mirren told Reuters when talking about her new “Love Ranch.”

Jul 1, 2010

Mel Gibson uses racial slur: report

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Oscar-winning director and actor Mel Gibson, who caused a media storm four years ago over an anti-Semitic statement, is again making headlines for using an apparent racial slur in an argument with his ex-girlfriend.

Celebrity news website Radaronline.com Thursday published excerpts of an audiotape of Gibson telling Oksana Grigorieva, whom “The Passion of the Christ” director is battling in court, that they way she is dressed made her look like a “pig in heat.”

Jun 30, 2010
via Fan Fare

Twi-hards howl for “Twilight Saga: Eclipse”

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We knew it would be big. We still don’t know how big, and we won’t until after the upcoming debut weekend. Read about the box office  here.

But we do know that even before it has played one full day in theaters, “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” has already broken a record. The film’s midnight screenings on Wednesday raked in more than $30 million at North American box offices. Read about that here. In fact, you can read about the movie here, a review here, our interview with Taylor Lautner here, and a story about Native Americans in the film, here.

Jun 28, 2010
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Chris Brown: time to forgive? How about forget?

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There is no doubt Chris Brown gave a strong performance of Michael Jackson songs at Sunday’s BET Awards. But the question it raised Sunday on the news floor here was: were his emotions real? If you don’t know what we’re talking about. You can read about it here or watch the video below.

Brown performed a medley of Michael Jackson songs that ended with “Man in the Mirror,” the King of Pop’s call for all of us to take a long look at ourselves and change in ways that make the world a better place to live. But instead of singing, Brown appeared overcome by the lyrics, seemed to be crying, tossed his earplug out of his ear at one point and bent to his knees in anguish before quickly leaving the stage soon after the song ended. He later returned after winning an “AOL Fan-demonium” award and said to the audience,  “I let y’all down before, but I won’t do it again. I promise.”

Jun 28, 2010

BET Awards honor Prince, Chris Brown wows crowd

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – The BET Awards on Sunday were hosted by a Queen and honored a Prince, but it was a fallen star, Chris Brown, who surprised fans with a tearful tribute to the late King of Pop.

Alicia Keys, Trey Songz, Nicki Minaj and current albums chart champ Drake were among the big winners at cable television network BET’s annual salute to R&B and hip-hop stars, while Diddy, Kanye West, Eminem and El DeBarge wowed the audience with their performances.

Jun 28, 2010

BET Awards honor Prince

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – The BET Awards on Sunday were hosted by a Queen and honored a Prince, but it was a fallen star, Chris Brown, who surprised fans with a tearful tribute to the late King of Pop.

Alicia Keys, Trey Songz, Nicki Minaj and current albums chart champ Drake were among the big winners at cable television network BET’s annual salute to R&B and hip-hop stars, while Diddy, Kanye West, Eminem and El DeBarge wowed the audience with their performances.

Jun 26, 2010

Global tribute marks year since Michael Jackson’s death

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Michael Jackson fans worldwide paid tribute to the late King of Pop on Friday, the first anniversary of his death, by remembering him in song and dance even as his father sued the doctor accused of sending the superstar to his grave.

In Tokyo, the “Thriller” singer’s followers spent the night among his possessions at a Michael Jackson exhibition, at New York’s famed Apollo theater they danced to his music, and along Hollywood’s Walk of Fame, they laid flowers by his star.

Jun 26, 2010
via Fan Fare

Connecting with Michael Jackson, one year after his death

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There were no seances to raise him from the dead (at least as far as we know), but people around the world were connecting to Michael Jackson again, one year after his death. In Tokyo, fans slept with his memorabilia. In Vietnam, they held a night of performances. In New York, they danced at the Apollo Theater, and in Los Angeles they waited to pay their respects at the Forest Lawn cemetery where his body was laid to rest. Those pictured at right are at a parade in Liepzig, Germany. Read the full story here.

There is no doubt Jackson was the King of Pop, but will he be remembered in the same way as Elvis or Marilyn Monroe? Will his songs be sung and his moonwalk be danced? Time will tell. But we were out on Hollywood Boulevard on Friday to talk to people about what they most remembered about Michael Jackson. Click below to see what they had to say.

Jun 25, 2010
via Fan Fare

Music to soothe the soul — even between Turks and Greeks

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(Writing and Reporting by Ayla Jean Yackley)

Turkish-Greek relations have never been smooth, exactly. The countries have gone to war against each other, and territory disputes continued to haunt them until the end of the 20th Century. Yet, in recent years, diplomacy has thawed the once icy relations between the two. This week, it was music that did the trick.

Not long after the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople, the majestic fourth-century Hagia Ereine, Istanbul’s first Christian church, was turned into a weapons storage facility, but this week it served as the venue for the Turkish debut of Iannis Xenakis’ “Oresteia,” the late Greek composer’s re-imagining of Aeschylus’ ancient tale of war, treachery, democracy and peace. The setting proved dramatic, and inspiring, as part of the International Istanbul Music Festival. The city is this year’s European Capital of Culture.

    • About Bob

      "It's pronounced tour-tell-ot. :-) I am a native of Oklahoma in the U.S. and have lived and worked in Washington, D.C., New York City and Los Angeles. I left Oklahoma and moved to New York in the early 1990s where I set up shop in the East Village (Manhattan), went to school at NYU and joined Reuters. In LA, I have covered the entertainment industry for 17 years, have been Reuters chief movie writer for more than a decade and am currently the entertainment editor."
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