Feb 21, 2014 20:58 UTC

Modern financial arts get special exhibition

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By Jeffrey Goldfarb

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Modern financial arts have been given a special exhibition. Washington’s estimable Corcoran Gallery, with its de Koonings and Twomblys, is being carved up like a common conglomerate. Los Angeles played host to a hostile museum takeover bid and Detroit’s restructuring features the paintings and sculptures of the city’s art institute. A blank spreadsheet is proving just as able to inspire as a canvas.

Feb 21, 2014 20:49 UTC

Spain’s BBVA keeps banking’s tech enemies close

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By Fiona Maharg-Bravo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Francisco Gonzalez, chairman of BBVA, recently said that banks needed to take on Amazon and Google or die. He aims to be one of the survivors. The 51 billion euro ($70 billion) Spanish bank has bought U.S.-based mobile banking technology startup Simple for $117 million. It may be a small deal, but it comes with potentially big implications for the industry.

Feb 20, 2014 20:53 UTC

How on earth can Facebook justify WhatsApp price?

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By Peter Thal Larsen and Rob Cox
The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

 

For mere mortals who haven’t partaken in whatever Kool-Aid Mark Zuckerberg is serving at Facebook’s Hacker Way headquarters, is there any way to justify the $19 billion it is paying for WhatsApp?

COMMENT

How long before the mobile operators enter the space , in software terms to duplicate whatApp would cost nothing , like wise they could block its use. Why allow an app that is eating away at your revenue stream. Facebook had to buy it because it was destroying their own user base .

Posted by frenchchef | Report as abusive
Feb 19, 2014 19:26 UTC

Diamond dealers show how to make M&A sparkle

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By Jeffrey Goldfarb
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

 

Leave it to a couple of diamond dealers to show how to make M&A sparkle. Jewelry retailer Signet’s stock shone brighter after it agreed to buy smaller rival Zale at a 41 percent premium for $1.4 billion. That’s what happens when the cost savings effectively cover the purchase price. It makes the tarnish on shareholder-unfriendly transactions involving Comcast and Jos. A. Bank all the more noticeable.

Feb 18, 2014 20:07 UTC

Actavis makes pharma deals look generic

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By Robert Cyran
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

 

Actavis makes pharmaceutical deals look generic. Its $25 billion acquisition of Forest Laboratories follows a familiar formula in the sector. Uppity investor? Check. Low-tax jurisdiction? Check. Buyer’s stock rises? Check. And over $8 billion of value created means financiers will keep busy with their own prescriptions for M&A success.

Feb 17, 2014 14:55 UTC

Vivendi’s SFR is top target for French cable king

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By Quentin Webb

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

France’s cable king promised investors a slew of deals when he floated Altice, his investment vehicle. The biggest and best would be Vivendi’s mobile operator SFR.

Feb 14, 2014 19:39 UTC

Jos. A. Bank’s daft deal knits owners in a bind

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By Robert Cyran
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Jos. A. Bank’s daft deal is knitting its shareholders in a bind. To avoid being acquired, or perhaps to fetch a higher price from rival Men’s Wearhouse, the suits retailer is issuing stock to buy Eddie Bauer at $56 a share, only to buy more back at $65. If the $875 million transaction isn’t unraveled, investors will find themselves painfully stitched up.

Feb 13, 2014 20:17 UTC

Comcast deal machine spits out a value destroyer

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By Rob Cox and Jeffrey Goldfarb
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

 

Comcast’s deal machine has spit out a value destroyer. Digesting Time Warner Cable is ambitious even for a serial acquirer like Chief Executive Brian Roberts. As with some of his many previous purchases, it looks set to generate a return on investment below Comcast’s cost of capital. That’s crummy but not criminal. It’s also not surprising given the medieval governance the Roberts family uses to oversee its fiefdom.

COMMENT

So Comcast isn’t a monopoly, Time-Warner isn’t a monopoly and the resulting behemoth wouldn’t be a monopoly either.

Thank you US anti-trust “guidelines”, always looking out for the consumer.

Posted by thebriang | Report as abusive
Feb 13, 2014 15:07 UTC

Comcast gives deal junkies lots to watch on cable

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By Jeffrey Golfarb
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Comcast just gave merger junkies plenty to watch on cable. The biggest U.S. operator has agreed to buy rival Time Warner Cable for $45 billion in stock, interrupting a hostile takeover attempt by smaller Charter Communications. The target got the price it wanted, but not the terms. Regulatory risks are high. And all eyes will still be on the crafty John Malone.

Feb 12, 2014 19:03 UTC

Cross-border arbitrage is expansive Bimbo’s yeast

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By Robert Cyran
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Cross-border arbitrage is the yeast for Grupo Bimbo’s aggressive expansion. In its latest deal north of the border, the acquisitive Mexican breadmaker is shelling out $1.8 billion to buy Canada Bread. Paying 20 times earnings to move into a mature market may seem questionable. But Bimbo’s earnings fetch an even higher multiple at home – and the deal should lower its weighted average cost of capital.