Jun 19, 2014 06:50 UTC

Tranquil markets may lead emerging nations astray

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By Andy Mukherjee 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The return of calm to global markets is not an unalloyed blessing for the developing world. In the year since investors freaked out about rising U.S. interest rates, JPMorgan’s emerging markets bond index has recovered almost all of its losses. That could tempt developing economies to abuse easy money and blow domestic asset bubbles.

Jun 17, 2014 13:58 UTC

China Macau tolerance won’t last forever

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By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Spreadsheets with astonishing forecasts can only tell so much about China’s economic miracle. The sole path to believing, or at least comprehending, the scale of the country’s development is to see it. And so it is with any attempt to grasp Macau’s transformation from a Portuguese trading outpost to the Middle Kingdom’s gambling and entertainment hub.

COMMENT

Hi, please contact our team via katrina.hamlin@thomsonreuters.com so we can try to resolve this.

Posted by Katrina Hamlin | Report as abusive
Jun 16, 2014 18:06 UTC

Gazprom/Ukraine dispute is proxy for Putin’s whims

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By Pierre Briançon 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Europe has long been used to the perennial drama of “Ukraine versus Gazprom,” but this year’s version is not your run-of-the-mill gas price dispute. Making good on a longstanding threat, Gazprom has said it will deliver gas to Ukraine only if it has been pre-paid. This comes after the Russian energy group failed to settle a dispute with Naftogaz, its Kiev-backed counterpart, over what it claims are more than $4 billion of overdue bills.

COMMENT

No wonder GOPers love Putin for his ‘strength’.
He has the same petty mean streak most of them do.

Posted by emm305 | Report as abusive
Jun 11, 2014 20:34 UTC

Obama student loan fix spares rod, spoils borrower

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By Daniel Indiviglio

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

President Barack Obama’s latest tweak to the U.S. student loan program spares the rod and spoils the borrower. Extending repayment caps and debt forgiveness to older graduates gives too many high earners a break. Making everyone pay a flat percentage of income would be simpler, fairer – and cheaper for taxpayers. It could also deliver a valuable lesson in financial responsibility.

COMMENT

Financial responsibility!!!!!.. That went away with bank sponsored legislation that rewrote the personal bankruptcy laws back in 2005. Thanks to the GOP and George bush, banks do not share in the risk of college lending as that debt can NEVER be forgiven via bankruptcy. No risk no responsibility.. Easy profits for the banks!!!

Couple that with college counselors selling degree programs with little financial viability and you get the mess we have now. Shame on the bankers and school administrators. At the university of Texas..in 2007.. School officials were implicated in a kick back system from loan originators!!!

I’d recommend requiring the university to carry the debt and the risk… They are in the best position to know what majors bring in a salary that can pay back the debt.. If a student defaults.. The university loses.. Make it part of their pension fund portfolio and all the university employees will work harder to produce financially responsible graduates!!!!

Posted by michaelryan | Report as abusive
Jun 10, 2014 14:28 UTC

Investors cheer for Brazil World Cup rout

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By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

At the opening of the Confederations Cup in Brasilia a year ago, President Dilma Rousseff was booed by thousands of soccer fans for all of Brazil to see. It’s easy to understand then why she isn’t planning to speak at Thursday’s opening ceremony of the World Cup. An embarrassing turn as host of Earth’s biggest sporting event – or crushing repeat of the 1950 Maracanaço – may be the greatest obstacle to her clinching a second term.

COMMENT

50 billion dollar stadiums do not solve poverty. They cause it. What an arrogant waste of money. Brazil already had stadiums. Why so flashy now?

Posted by AlkalineState | Report as abusive
Jun 10, 2014 07:12 UTC

China’s mini-stimulus verges on micro-management

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By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Fine-tuning and micro-management are close cousins. China’s central bank is tending toward the latter. The latest policy tweak will let some banks lend more to the rural sector, and fits a wider regulatory trend of selective easing. But it adds needless complexity, and takes China further from its stated goal of being more market-driven.

Jun 9, 2014 07:19 UTC

China-U.S. cyber spat risks corporate casualties

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By Ethan Bilby

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s security spat with the United States risks corporate casualties on both sides. The People’s Republic has responded to U.S. allegations of cyber spying by targeting American tech companies. A continuing dispute could lead to blocked deals in the United States and lost sales in China. Though companies can try to ease concerns, it’s hard for them to escape a political escalation.

COMMENT

Well if the Chinese start blocking their markets to certain companies these same companies should stop hiring in China and move to other countries instead especially America if they are in fact American companies. These companies should also put a halt on hiring Chinese nationals in other countries where they have offices.

Posted by CountryPride | Report as abusive
Jun 4, 2014 07:55 UTC

China wrestles with repression of financial sort

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By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China is richer and more stable than when tanks rolled into Tiananmen Square 25 years ago. Then, incomplete political reforms led to chaos, violence and retrenchment. While there’s little risk of that now, a similar dynamic is playing out in the financial system.

Jun 3, 2014 14:54 UTC

Fed fundamentalists deserve fresh listen

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By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

A portrait of Milton Friedman hangs at the entrance to the Stauffer Auditorium at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution. It carries no identification, and doesn’t need any. All who enter here can be counted on to recognize the patron saint of contemporary free-market economics. And so it was two days last week, when the leaders of what might be dubbed monetary fundamentalism gathered under Friedman’s watchful gaze.

COMMENT

Trickery cannot replace a merit based society. When those with real capabilities are limited by those that manipulate you demotivate the capable. Fill their spots with your vacuous minions if you like but you lose in the long term. Things like justice and liberty and law are necessary for very practical reasons, not simply to placate the masses in a fake way. Without them (and we are without them) what is the point of endeavour? The central bank and their army of manipulators are simply tricksters.

Posted by brotherkenny4 | Report as abusive
May 27, 2014 13:38 UTC

Italy’s lesson for Europe: do your homework

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By Neil Unmack

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Italy has a lesson for Europe: do your homework. The victory of Matteo Renzi’s Democratic Party in European Parliament elections demonstrates that a strong domestic politician can be more appealing than euro-bashing, even in a sickly economy.