Dec 3, 2013 05:05 UTC

“Secular stagnation” lament revives wealth paradox

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Larry Summers reckons rich countries are suffering from long-term stagnation. If accurate, the former U.S. treasury secretary’s view is chilling. It has also revived an old, unresolved puzzle: Why doesn’t the world’s capital willingly go where it’s most needed?

Dec 2, 2013 06:33 UTC

China index: Sober lending, spending slows growth

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By Katrina Hamlin

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Our alternative index shows China’s growth prospects at a four-month low. Lack-luster exports played a part. But the dip also reflected a healthy slow-down in new loans, sales of property and Audis, as well as a sharp fall in luxury liquor stocks.

Dec 2, 2013 06:21 UTC

Bangkok’s fiscal bias fans Thai political angst

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Thailand’s turmoil has its roots in extreme inequality. The most recent protests – the latest in an ongoing political crisis – is at least partly a reflection of a deeper chasm worsened by a biased fiscal policy.

Nov 29, 2013 05:37 UTC

Australia too mealy-mouthed on protectionism

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By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Australia is being mealy mouthed about protectionism. Treasurer Joe Hockey blocked the A$3.4 billion ($3.1 billion) takeover of agricultural trader GrainCorp by U.S. rival ADM on Nov. 29, on the grounds that Australia’s grain market is only just getting used to competition, five years after the national wheat monopoly was disbanded. For Australia’s foreign investment prospects, the decision itself is less bad than the ambiguity over why it was made.

Nov 27, 2013 03:11 UTC

How Cinda squares China’s debt triangles

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By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China Cinda has spotted a clever arbitrage. The Chinese “bad bank”, which is revving up for a Hong Kong initial public offering (IPO), has recently been doing brisk business by borrowing cheaply from other banks and using those funds to buy up companies’ short-term loans to each other. In doing so, it has found a way to square China’s dreaded “debt triangles”.

Nov 25, 2013 07:03 UTC

Iran deal offers the world a ray of hope

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By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Iran’s nuclear deal offers the world a ray of hope. It won’t be easy to turn the agreement to curb Tehran’s nuclear activities from a six-month accord into a lasting solution that assures the world the country’s nuclear programme is peaceful. But the resulting diplomatic goodwill should make it harder to go backwards.

Nov 22, 2013 03:15 UTC

Global deflation – not quite Marx’s prophecy

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Shares of profits in national incomes are soaring; those of wages are falling. It’s a recipe for corrosive and creeping deflation.

Nov 21, 2013 01:54 UTC

Asia’s fear of Fed is now infecting more economies

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

After a rough summer, Asian markets are calm once again. But beneath the surface, the fear of what the Federal Reserve may do next is beginning to spread beyond India and Indonesia.

COMMENT

Asian countries can reduce their Treasuries holdings to mitigate the Fed tapering exercise.

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Nov 20, 2013 05:43 UTC

Chinese “fixers” speak to Wall Street weakness

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By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Wall Street banks used to argue privately that hiring consultants in China was the only way to get ahead. Now their worth is under the spotlight, after the New York Times reported that JPMorgan Chase paid $1.8 million to a two-person consultancy run by the daughter of Wen Jiabao, then China’s premier. The real mystery is why banks that have been in China for so long still need the extra help.

Nov 18, 2013 04:24 UTC

The ‘Abe put’ will keep Japanese equities buoyed

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By Peter Thal Larsen

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist.  The opinions expressed are his own.

Say sayonara to the “Bernanke put” and hello to Shinzo Abe’s alternative. While the Federal Reserve chairman developed a reputation for supporting the price of bonds, the Japanese prime minister’s reforms are designed to push up stock prices.