Oct 9, 2014 21:54 UTC

Twitter free-speech chirps carry overtone of risk

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By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Twitter’s chirping about corporate free speech carries an overtone of risk. After its UK super-injunction tiff, the microblogging service is fighting for the right to disclose secret U.S. demands for data. The two cases show firms have power to resist being muzzled – or forced to speak. That helps check judicial and government overreach, but it could also undermine useful regulation.

Oct 8, 2014 21:08 UTC

A creative NFL would lean in to Sheryl Sandberg as commissioner

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

The latest uproar over the National Football League may have died down, but team owners convening this week are fooling themselves if they think the backlash is over – or that Commissioner Roger Goodell won’t bungle the next big controversy that comes along. An unconventional idea for a replacement is Facebook No. 2 Sheryl Sandberg.

COMMENT

I like your idea here, however the commissioner has more important thing to do then taking on technological expertise. I don’t think a new commissioner is going to misstep with regard to this because he or she didn’t have a background. Actually, Former Secretary Of State Condileeza Rice says its her dream job. She has the depth the diplomatic and mediation skills and knowledge of the sport. Likewise, she has a sense of what entertainment is having been a concert pianist herself.

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Oct 8, 2014 06:55 UTC

Asian fight against capital flight helps dollar

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The U.S. dollar could be the winner of Asia’s fight against capital flight. The world economy might be the loser.

Oct 2, 2014 07:26 UTC

Occupy misses real threats to Hong Kong’s future

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By Robyn Mak

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement misses the real threats to Hong Kong’s future. While tens of thousands of protesters led by students have taken to the streets demanding electoral reform, most of the former British colony’s 7.2 million residents have shied away. Universal suffrage deserves public support, but the gradual erosion of rule of law and free speech poses a greater threat to the city’s prosperity. It’s unlikely these concerns can unite the region in open confrontation with Beijing.

COMMENT

There’s a ton of support for the movement in HK, and contrary to what you write they don’t seem afraid of the CCP or PLA. The right to peacefully protest is something that should be a civil right. It’s something, along with free speech, that people in China don’t have, and that people in HK are afraid of losing should they no longer be able to select their own leader.

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Oct 1, 2014 18:03 UTC

Cameron takes deficit amnesia to a new level

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By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

David Cameron crowed when UK opposition leader Ed Miliband forgot the deficit in a keynote speech last week. Yet Britain’s prime minister has now taken deficit amnesia to a new level, insisting on the need to tackle the country’s biggest problem while simultaneously pledging a tax giveaway. It’s an electoral bribe he can’t afford.

Oct 1, 2014 15:16 UTC

Ebola sets clock ticking on West African economy

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By Martin Hutchinson

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

The West African economy may yet survive Ebola – but the clock is ticking. Matching the last four years’ 28 pct growth isn’t realistic. Controlling the deadly outbreak before year’s end, though, could preserve enough investment and resources to meet an expanding population’s needs. Given the virus has already spread as far as America, there’s no time to waste.

Oct 1, 2014 13:11 UTC

Hong Kong harmony hits Beijing’s worst fears

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By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Protests often start out peaceful, then fizzle out, or descend into chaos. So far, Hong Kong is turning that playbook on its head. Demonstrators whose demands for democratic elections were met with tear gas and batons on Sept. 29 had, by the next day, settled into a kind of happy, harmonious state. For the authorities in Beijing, that’s potentially an even more nerve-jangling state of affairs.

COMMENT

What does this unprecedented uproar in Hong Kong presage >,,, Mainland intervention a la Tienamen Square ? Spreading disturbances clear across China ?
An orderly reconciliation? …or even an upheaval ?

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Sep 29, 2014 07:32 UTC

Hong Kong shreds hopes for orderly disorder

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By Robyn Mak and John Foley

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own. 

Hong Kong’s experiment in orderly disorder is coming unstuck. Thousands of protestors took to the streets on Sept. 29 calling for political reform and universal suffrage, and many still remain a day later. Markets are open, and the financial sector hasn’t taken any direct hits. But what started as a meticulously planned act of civil disobedience now risks spiralling into something more volatile and unpredictable, with damaging long term-implications for the city.

COMMENT

It will fade in 6 weeks and just be a sad memory of lack of action by more citizens.

Posted by Butch_from_PA | Report as abusive
Sep 29, 2014 07:29 UTC
kateduguid

Rock star Modi needs more business-friendly riff

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By Kate Duguid

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. 

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi used his headline gig at Madison Square Garden to make an emotional sales pitch on Sunday morning. His suggestion that Indian-Americans invest freely in their ancestral land was met with wild cheers from the capacity crowd. But even for a politician with a rock star’s popularity, the country’s business-unfriendly reputation remains a formidable obstacle.

Sep 25, 2014 23:51 UTC

Wall Street needs sheriff more than toll collector

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By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Wall Street needs a sheriff more than a glorified toll collector. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is stepping down after squeezing multibillion-dollar penalties from the likes of JPMorgan and Bank of America. He had less success securing convictions, though, making law enforcement just an expensive cost of doing business. Next financial crisis, Uncle Sam should send in a tougher cop.