Sep 29, 2014 07:32 UTC

Hong Kong shreds hopes for orderly disorder

Photo

By Robyn Mak and John Foley

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own. 

Hong Kong’s experiment in orderly disorder is coming unstuck. Thousands of protestors took to the streets on Sept. 29 calling for political reform and universal suffrage, and many still remain a day later. Markets are open, and the financial sector hasn’t taken any direct hits. But what started as a meticulously planned act of civil disobedience now risks spiralling into something more volatile and unpredictable, with damaging long term-implications for the city.

COMMENT

It will fade in 6 weeks and just be a sad memory of lack of action by more citizens.

Posted by Butch_from_PA | Report as abusive
Sep 29, 2014 07:29 UTC
kateduguid

Rock star Modi needs more business-friendly riff

Photo

By Kate Duguid

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. 

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi used his headline gig at Madison Square Garden to make an emotional sales pitch on Sunday morning. His suggestion that Indian-Americans invest freely in their ancestral land was met with wild cheers from the capacity crowd. But even for a politician with a rock star’s popularity, the country’s business-unfriendly reputation remains a formidable obstacle.

Sep 25, 2014 23:51 UTC

Wall Street needs sheriff more than toll collector

Photo

By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Wall Street needs a sheriff more than a glorified toll collector. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is stepping down after squeezing multibillion-dollar penalties from the likes of JPMorgan and Bank of America. He had less success securing convictions, though, making law enforcement just an expensive cost of doing business. Next financial crisis, Uncle Sam should send in a tougher cop.

Sep 24, 2014 22:06 UTC

Uncle Sam gets wires crossed on data privacy

Photo

By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Uncle Sam has gotten his wires crossed on internet data privacy. A hacker went to prison for exposing private customer information that AT&T failed to protect from online access. Now U.S. prosecutors are defending their right to do essentially the same thing in the Silk Road drug-website case. Anti-hacking laws are tough to take seriously when even enforcers can’t decide what’s allowed.

Sep 23, 2014 18:02 UTC

Tax clampdown could deter half-baked pharma M&A

Photo

By Neil Unmack and Robert Cyran

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

The U.S. clampdown on tax-driven cross-border M&A should deter half-baked pharma deals. Some U.S.-led transactions, like AbbVie’s recent agreement to buy UK-based Shire, may survive on strategic logic. But pure tax-avoiding combinations look tricky.

Sep 23, 2014 07:35 UTC

China rich list misses most valuable asset: status

Photo

By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

What’s the most precious asset for China’s plutocrats? Not diamonds, or prime real estate, or even a stake in a richly valued internet company. The currency that really matters is status. That’s something rankings like the new Hurun Report of China’s richest individuals struggle to measure.

Sep 19, 2014 07:54 UTC

Scots’ no to independence still leaves UK in limbo

Photo

By George Hay

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Scotland’s landmark decision to reject independence is not the end of British uncertainty. The 55:45 split, with almost all the votes counted early on Sept. 19, leaves the UK intact. But the terms of the unionist victory introduce tensions which could yet lead to a national division.

Sep 19, 2014 06:31 UTC

Australia at sharp end of China outbound ambition

Photo

By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

The most surprising thing about a walk through central Sydney is China. Its influence is everywhere. Activists protest 1989’s Tiananmen Square massacre near the Sydney Opera House. A bilingual Mandarin school is under construction in the affluent Chatswood district. And the effect of Chinese money on the property market has become a dinner party favorite.

COMMENT

Deceptive one-sided article. China is a communist police state, a detail you conspiculously tried to hide….

Posted by aristidis500 | Report as abusive
Sep 17, 2014 08:20 UTC

China stealth stimulus may slip down back of sofa

Photo

By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

As China’s economy slows, its authorities must think ever faster. A 500 billion yuan ($81 billion) injection of central bank funds into the country’s biggest five lenders – reported by online media group Sina on Sept. 17 – is unusual and symbolic. But in figurative terms it may just slip down the back of the sofa.

Sep 16, 2014 16:48 UTC

Applying corporate finance to nations

Photo

By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

It is generally accepted on Wall Street that breaking up bloated and unwieldy companies is a good thing. Division makes them easier to manage, more accountable and allows them to deliver greater value to their many constituents. On the eve of Scotland’s historic vote on independence, it’s worth considering whether the same logic might also be applied to nations.

COMMENT

I sure wish Texas would secede. South Carolina is irrelevant. They are a self limiting entity anyway, because of their inability to release themselves from their past prejudices and their religious fervor with regard to the justifications of immoral actions. In other words, they are old fashioned believers in birth right and the power of money. Basically royalists without the royalty. Anyway, South Carolina is unimportant because they make themselves that way through stupity, both on a political and economic level. They probably think differently on this than I, but then they are likely deeply in love with themselves too.

Posted by brotherkenny4 | Report as abusive