Feb 12, 2013 12:02 UTC

Interview questions for the new BOJ chief

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s war on deflation will soon have a new general. A hard-charging Bank of Japan governor with strong conviction and oodles of savvy could help bring Abe’s plan to fruition.

Feb 6, 2013 07:42 UTC

Dividend reform won’t fix China SOE money-go-round

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By John Foley

(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own)

China’s elaborate money-go-round starts and ends with its cash-hoarding state-owned enterprises. So a plan to make them pay bigger dividends sounds promising. Still, if the goal is to return cash to the people, there is a long way to go.

Jan 30, 2013 09:32 UTC

Singapore’s demographic engineering on right track

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist.  The opinions expressed are his own.

Singapore’s audacious proposal to squeeze 30 percent more residents on a tiny island between now and 2030 is fraught with political risks for the ruling party. Voters won’t like it. But it’s prudent economics.

Jan 29, 2013 08:53 UTC

Rate cuts won’t revive India’s stalled growth

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(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own)

By Andy Mukherjee

India’s latest interest rate cut won’t revive growth. The central bank’s quarter-percentage point reduction in the policy rate, to 7.75 percent, is just as futile as the last one almost a year ago. GDP will pick up when New Delhi curbs its own profligacy and improves the investment climate. The February budget may be the current government’s last chance to do both.

Jan 24, 2013 08:47 UTC

South Korea may need a rate cut to fight weak yen

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Japan’s weak yen policy could be South Korea’s biggest economic enemy this year. The strengthening won, which has risen 23 percent against the yen in the past six months, was partly to blame for the country’s anaemic GDP growth in the fourth quarter. It’s also putting the squeeze on manufacturers like Hyundai. Lower interest rates could help to ease the pressure.

Jan 23, 2013 13:22 UTC
Edward Hadas

Cameron bets big on confused European ideas

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By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

David Cameron is loyal to a European Union. Sadly, it is not the EU that happens to exist, or is likely to exist any time soon. The British prime minister tried to outline his position in a speech on Wednesday, which culminated with the promise of a UK referendum on membership some years from now. Yet his dreaming is confused and counterproductive.

COMMENT

Some of us care as much about democracy as economic efficiency.

Not a very popular idea for M. Hadas. Very poor article.

Posted by TheSweeperUp | Report as abusive
Jan 22, 2013 09:09 UTC

BOJ must now make its bold inflation goal credible

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

After more than a decade of feigning helplessness against falling prices, the Bank of Japan has finally signed up for combat duty.

Jan 17, 2013 09:48 UTC
Edward Hadas

China’s growth model disrupts the world order

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By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s growth is disrupting the world order. It’s not just the size of the economy, set to surpass that of the euro zone around 2017, according to Axa Investment Management. Nor is it the country’s rapid growth. It is more the way China has made three big accepted ideas about development seem wrong. The effects could be temporary – or disastrous.

COMMENT

Your picture of China is unreasonally black. While it is true that China is facing many problems, but you have failed to see many other factors taht have contributed to China’s success and these factors might be the ones that contributed to the failure here in the U.S.

These factors include (1) people who grow up after China opened her door, who have been exposed to outside ideas and who are the force for progress and for perpectuating the progress China has thus made; (2) education. While the myth has been like this — Chinese students are good at book learning and not as innovative and creative as western students. But one of the PISA test (2009) results demonstrate the quality of Chinese education, which has been nourished and supported by families. While education has always been the strenght in Asian countries, the U.S.-led western world more and more show declines in their education achievement, especially in U.S. which leads it more and more unable to fill its high-tech labor market. (3) Hard work ethic. Compare to the U.S. China has a lot less social parasites living on the wellfare of the states and the government. Chinese people, no matter who they are, are praised and famous for their hard work, which will turn into high productivity. On the other hand, in the U.S. with the jobs shipped overseas, there is less and less productivity as less people produce value. A country cannot expect grow through consumption. Imagine what it is like when all goes to consume and nobody produces?

Posted by yanwen | Report as abusive
Jan 16, 2013 09:23 UTC

Thailand’s unsustainable boom is piling up risks

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Thailand is booming again, but the foundations of its growth revival are wobbly. Unless policies and politics become more robust, the Southeast Asian nation’s economy may find its momentum hard to sustain.

Jan 11, 2013 07:05 UTC

Japan’s fiscal stimulus is call for action to BOJ

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Japan’s new prime minister has thrown the country’s central bank a $117 billion challenge.