Dec 17, 2012 20:57 UTC

Congress should push for mandatory gun insurance

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By Robert Cyran and Reynolds Holding

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

Congress should push for mandatory gun insurance. Firearm ownership is a U.S. constitutional right. But as last week’s massacre again demonstrated, it comes at a cost. Requiring liability coverage could be one way to keep the most dangerous weapons from unstable hands without infringing the law.

COMMENT

I totally agree with guns requiring liability insurance, even in case of a stolen weapon, the owner / insurance should liable if it was due to his negligence.

For all you gun nuts flashing the 2nd amendment. Realize that the 2nd amendment was not written by God, it was written by men & at a time when the world was a much different place with very different weapons.

You want to own a weapon, you should also own the responsibility & liability.

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Dec 17, 2012 11:20 UTC

Abe era will herald a three-digit yen

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The Shinzo Abe era will herald a spectacular decline in the yen. The promise by Japan’s newly elected prime minister to end the country’s chronic deflation spells curtains for the half-hearted quantitative easing that has been the Bank of Japan’s hallmark for more than a decade. At some point in 2013, one U.S. dollar will buy 100 yen or more.

Dec 13, 2012 09:35 UTC

Qatar gives SocGen an honourable exit from Egypt

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By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Qatar has given Societe Generale an honorable exit from Egypt. State-backed Qatar National Bank will buy the French bank’s 77 percent stake in its Egyptian unit, National Societe Generale Bank (NSGB), through a mandatory tender offer valuing the whole at $2.6 billion. The valuation of 2 times book value is lower than pre-revolution multiples, and SocGen will have to carry some currency risk. But with few-sizeable buyers willing to live with Arab spring volatility, it makes sense for SocGen to shrink while it can.

Dec 11, 2012 03:11 UTC

Japan’s elections: A guide for the perplexed

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

For once, the outcome of a Japanese election may actually matter. The country’s politicians have proved largely powerless to reverse two decades of economic stagnation. Now voters, dismayed by the centre-left, may hand power back to the conservative Liberal Democratic Party. But patience with cosmetic change is running thin.

Dec 4, 2012 14:56 UTC
Hugo Dixon

Boris Johnson intervention reduces Brexit chances

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By Hugo Dixon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own

Boris Johnson’s intervention in the European debate reduces the chance of a British exit from the European Union – or Brexit. The Mayor of London, a popular Conservative politician, says he will campaign to keep Britain in the EU provided it can negotiate a pared-down relationship based on the single market.

Dec 4, 2012 08:37 UTC

SEC learns true cost of China accounting goodwill

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By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s shaky accounting practices are a sound target for U.S. regulators. Or at least, they would have been ten years ago. The Securities and Exchange Commission’s action against China-based auditors, including affiliates of big accountants like KPMG and Deloitte who refuse to hand over files on U.S.-listed companies, comes too late. If the SEC pushes the point, it could bring a moral victory, but a financial mess.

COMMENT

Caveat emptor – buyer beware!

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Dec 3, 2012 22:00 UTC

Wall Street deal-making has lesson for Washington

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By Jeffrey Goldfarb

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

When it comes to deal-making, Washington could learn from Wall Street. The U.S. budget talks have become the equivalent of an ugly, public merger proxy battle. While investment bankers are often too eager to push for a deal, they also know that negotiating in public usually only makes things tougher.

COMMENT

I think that every congressman should be able to draw a diagram for any individual in any industry such that the diagram shows the avenues by which money spent by the individual circulate back to the individual. Without this visualization, no person can discus what improves or impedes the circulation of money. With this visualization, we can imagine many different excellent solutions to the fiscal conflict.

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Nov 30, 2012 13:37 UTC

UK could raid the rich to boost a poor economy

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By Ian Campbell

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own

George Osborne has his hands tied. Britain’s Chancellor of the Exchequer wants to boost a flat economy but he needs to tighten policy to hit his targets and meet his own fiscal rules. He may well be able to square the circle in next week’s Autumn Statement – by taking from the rich and putting money into poorer hands that are eager to spend.

COMMENT

If Osborne wants to put money into poorer hands then he should stipulate that the richer hands spend more money. This could be the basis for a new taxing concept focussed around the problem of moving money out of richer hands. Imagine that instead of raising income taxes on the rich or taxing their properties, we stipulate that they must spend 50% (or 80% or 90%) of their income on taxable purchases. This concept would generate tax revenue. It would move cash out of rich hands. AND it would stimulate the economy.

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Nov 29, 2012 14:37 UTC

Spain’s bank rescue is part bail-in, part bail-out

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By George Hay and Neil Unmack

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own

Spain’s bank haircuts are part bail-in, and part bail-out. The indebted government has lopped 10 billion euros off its euro zone-funded bank rescue bill by cutting the value of its worst lenders’ hybrid debt. Yet if it hadn’t been for political considerations, the burden-sharing might have been greater.

Nov 28, 2012 12:45 UTC

Carney at BoE changes the game for UK banks

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By George Hay

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own

Mark Carney’s appointment as governor of the Bank of England changes the game for UK banks. On the big issues – capital, liquidity, and structural reform – the Canadian central banker is unlikely to deviate significantly from current policies. But the new man’s different skills and interests, compared to current incumbent Mervyn King, could still make a tangible difference.