Aug 4, 2014 18:45 UTC

Vladimir Putin is the new bad weather

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By Richard Beales and Jeffrey Goldfarb

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

Vladimir Putin is not just bad news but also bad weather. Unrest in Ukraine has become the bogeyman to replace snow when a company’s profit hopes need to be managed downward. Just ask Volkswagen or McDonald’s. The World Cup goes the other way, helping Twitter and maybe Walt Disney. The message could be muddled in four years when Russia and soccer converge.

COMMENT

Putin is waiting for winter to come.In the whole game his hand is up.Release of oil from US is expensive due to transport cost and is not enough for whole EU and Ukraine.Putin can bear sanctions with support of Asian countries.I am not prorussian but the so far events indicate.

Posted by gentalman | Report as abusive
Jul 30, 2014 13:08 UTC

EU will find Russian sanctions worth the pain

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By Pierre Briançon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

It took time for European Union leaders to agree on tough economic sanctions against Russia. The EU is slow. Its members have conflicting interests. Their economies don’t all have the same exposure to Russia. Yet they have finally agreed with the United States on a list of measures to punish Russian banks and oil companies. The already weak EU economy will suffer in return. But over time, Europe will find that the sanctions were worth the pain.

COMMENT

I agree with this article.

No wanted any trouble with Russia–either in Europe or the US.

There has been a political tug-of-war between the Russia and the West in the Ukraine for some time. Russia has been fixing elections and supporting pro-Russian candidates in the Ukraine. Ethnic Ukrainians have been given candidates who are puppets of Russia and Putin.

Putin’s claim that the US is at fault for meddling in Ukrainian politics is another big Putin line. Russia has been meddling in Ukrainian politics long before the US got involved–and the Orange Revolution was a manifestation of ethnic Ukrainian dissatisfaction with Russian control.

I hope the world has learned by now that dictators who choose to bully other nations need very clear signals (short of war) that their behavior is unacceptable. The absence of clear signals (sanctions that hurt) is invariably seen by the dictator as tacit approval or acceptance of their bullying–and leads to more egregious behavior.

Hitler’s rise is a case study in how ineffectual responses by European nations encourages future violence.

Europeans, of all people, should remember their history.

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Jul 30, 2014 08:20 UTC

China’s political purges call for financial sequel

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By John Foley

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The formal investigation of China’s former security chief Zhou Yongkang, almost ten months after he was last seen in public, makes compelling viewing. What is needed next is a financial sequel.

Jul 29, 2014 15:54 UTC

MetLife CEO should revel in his anonymity

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By Rob Cox

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Quick, who’s the chief executive of MetLife? That the name Steve Kandarian doesn’t roll off the tongue for almost anyone who isn’t deeply steeped in the insurance business is probably a good thing for his shareholders. How he handles his company’s inevitable designation later this week as a systemic threat to the financial industry could change that. A Jamie Dimon-style public spat with regulators would be foolish. Better to speak softly, and keep the CEO’s relative anonymity intact.

Jul 28, 2014 06:48 UTC

China throws weight around on car parts costs

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By Ethan Bilby 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s competition watchdog has forced luxury carmakers into a U-turn. The whiff of a probe into vehicle parts was enough to get Audi and Jaguar Land Rover to reduce their prices, even though neither has been publicly deemed to be abusing its position. Experience shows in China it is better to admit guilt early than risk bigger fines, or lose access to a critical market.

Jul 24, 2014 08:14 UTC

China’s old meat is a corporate health warning

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By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Old meat in China’s fast-food chain brings a health warning for foreign companies doing business in the country. After getting fat on rapid growth, some are discovering nasties hidden within their ample folds.

Jul 22, 2014 07:24 UTC

Japan’s bond-hugging banks are pinning Abe down

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Japanese lenders’ outsized government bond holdings have Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in a chokehold. Unless banks shed the load now, they might try to dump the debt when the Bank of Japan stops printing money and causes bond prices to fall. A stampede could rattle the financial system and dent Abe’s anti-deflation campaign.

Jul 18, 2014 06:29 UTC

Malaysia Airlines plight points to riskier world

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By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Fatal air accidents almost never happen, fortunately for both passengers and investors in airlines. Yet Malaysia Airlines has been struck twice by tragedy in little over four months. The aviation industry may have its own set of challenges, but it is a reminder that even more robust businesses need to consider political risk carefully.

COMMENT

Our Vice President of the United States of America has said that Putin has no soul. Vice President Biden is correct. Dr. Putin has no soul. The reason that teams of investigators cannot access the crash site of the downed Malaysian commercial airliner is that Putin has a great deal to hide.

We had a similar occurrence with the weapons of mass destruction in Iraq during the administration of President George Bush. By the time the international team of weapons inspectors were able to gain access to Iraq to investigate whether or not there were weapons of mass destruction, large convoys of Russian trucks had bussed the weapons from Iraq to Syria. The international community had no proof of any weapons and I feel very much now that we will not be able to gather proof to substantiate that Russia intentionally shot down this defenseless Malaysian commercial airliner because Putin was angry over the recent sanctions that had been imposed by the international community.

Putin is a coward and Putin is a bully. Every time things don’t go his way he bullies one of his neighbors. Now, the international community is sick and tired of his antics and more severe recent sanctions are being imposed that are actually crippling Russia’s already fragile economy.

As if anyone believes that Russia has a superior military power just look at their silly parades down the street that they have on occasion in Moscow with their old dilapidated trucks and military weaponry. Putin’s economy is dependent upon taking from weaker countries just like a bully does. Putin will not threaten the United States of America nor will the United States of America allow this bully to continue to threaten, take over and kill more good people of this world who deserve to be ridden of this bully. Putin has no soul.

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Jul 16, 2014 05:07 UTC

China’s “De-IOE” campaign takes a bite out of tech

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By Rob Cyran 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s “De-IOE” campaign is taking a bite out of some Silicon Valley stalwarts. For those unfamiliar with the term, it’s being used by tech executives to describe Beijing’s nudging of state enterprises to wean themselves off U.S. software and service firms, chiefly IBM, Oracle and EMC. The drive, which has been going on for at least a year, but accelerated after Washington indicted Chinese army officials, has dimmed the brightest star in Big Tech’s otherwise dull constellation.

Jul 15, 2014 07:00 UTC

China’s corruption purge nears tricky second phase

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By John Foley 

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist.  The opinions expressed are his own.

China is entering the second stage of its colossal fight against graft. Nabbing high-profile culprits was a good start. Now, other miscreants have to believe the same could happen to them. Finally, the rewards for good behaviour must be made comparable to the spoils of wickedness. From here, things get tougher.