Oct 30, 2014 17:43 UTC

Tim Cook’s pride may expand corporate talent pool

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The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Tim Cook’s pride may expand the corporate talent pool. The Apple chief executive’s decision to speak publicly about being gay should help advance the slow march toward acceptance. As boss of the world’s biggest company by market value, Cook could inspire others, giving C-suites and boardrooms more choice. They need it.

Oct 30, 2014 17:23 UTC

REIT scandal could be good test for Sarbanes-Oxley

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By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

A scandal at one of America’s biggest real-estate investment trusts could be the perfect test for the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. American Realty Capital Properties’ stock tanked nearly 20 percent on Wednesday after the company said mistakes in its financial statements were intentionally left uncorrected. That sounds tailor-made for a case under the often-ignored law inspired by Enron, WorldCom and other accounting debacles.

Oct 28, 2014 06:23 UTC

Hong Kong protests reach polite impasse

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By Peter Thal Larsen

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The most surprising thing about Hong Kong’s pro-democracy campaigners is that they are still there. A month after a small group of students stormed a space outside the government’s head office, the protests now known as the “umbrella movement” have confounded predictions of chaos, apathy or a violent crackdown by China. Though a compromise on democratic reform remains as distant as ever, Hong Kong’s mostly civil activists have changed the city’s political geography for good.

Oct 24, 2014 16:32 UTC

Review: World needs agreed ground rules for peace

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By Martin Hutchinson

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Henry Kissinger argues in “World Order” that the world needs agreed ground rules as a precondition for achieving peace. The prevailing approach in the West, derived from the 1648 Treaty of Westphalia, of nation states with limited conflicts isn’t reflected in the traditions of emerging nations like China or India. However the 1814 Vienna Congress’s innovation of allowing intervention of great powers only to protect stability might work better.

Oct 23, 2014 06:24 UTC

Robots may spell “Control-Alt-Delete” for workers

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By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Human beings can never run out of work. Adam Smith held that cheery view, and so far he has been proved right. But can the invisible hand match up to the robotic arm? About 47 percent of existing U.S. jobs are at risk from computerisation, according to an Oxford University study published last year. If wage incomes were to disappear in a short time, the results could be cataclysmic for prosperity and peace.

COMMENT

If true, there will be a large upper class and large lower class, not much middle class. Lower class will find jobs giving the rich massages, sex, and butlers.

Hopefully robots will take over fast food and fruit/vegetable picking SOON. That’ll end the liberal politicing over them.

Posted by Factoidz | Report as abusive
Oct 21, 2014 07:18 UTC

Hong Kong tycoons can be part of protest solution

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By Una Galani

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Hong Kong’s tycoons could be part of ending the standoff with pro-democracy activists. The city’s business leaders have an outsize influence over local politics. Relaxing their grip on special corporate votes could ease divisions over electoral reform as well as tensions over rampant inequality.

Oct 20, 2014 07:38 UTC

Abenomics hits a speed bump, not a road block

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By Peter Thal Larsen

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Shinzo Abe’s plan to lure more women into the Japanese workforce just suffered a symbolic but high-profile setback. Two female ministers resigned on Oct. 20 just two months after they were elevated in a cabinet reshuffle. It’s another headache for the current Japanese prime minister, who is already grappling with stuttering economic growth. Yet some of his other reforms are moving ahead.

Oct 13, 2014 19:07 UTC

Bankers get painful and needed conflicts reminder

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By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Bankers just got handed a painful, and necessary, reminder about conflicts of interest. A $76 million penalty against RBC Capital Markets for working both sides of a deal is the latest blow to skewed loyalties. Even with recent knocks against Goldman Sachs and Barclays, however, it isn’t clear the message is reaching Wall Street.

Oct 10, 2014 06:36 UTC

Hong Kong weathers Occupy’s financial disruption

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By Robyn Mak

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Hong Kong’s economy is coping with pro-democracy protests, now heading into their third week. Some retailers and other businesses have suffered and traffic is bad, but the city’s financial system is undisturbed. A prolonged standoff between protesters and the government matters less to investors than the slowdown in consumption and spending in mainland China. Warnings that the movement would threaten Hong Kong’s financial health look misplaced.

Oct 9, 2014 21:54 UTC

Twitter free-speech chirps carry overtone of risk

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By Reynolds Holding

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Twitter’s chirping about corporate free speech carries an overtone of risk. After its UK super-injunction tiff, the microblogging service is fighting for the right to disclose secret U.S. demands for data. The two cases show firms have power to resist being muzzled – or forced to speak. That helps check judicial and government overreach, but it could also undermine useful regulation.