Jun 7, 2013 17:21 UTC

Review: Hollywood blinds itself to Google’s faults

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By Rob Cox
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Rarely has a cinematic depiction of a business delivered as wet a kiss as “The Internship,” a new buddy film. Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson play second fiddle to the real star: a silver screen version of Google’s corporate culture. The movie makes the Internet firm – unofficial motto: “Don’t be evil” – look less evil than is remotely plausible.

Apr 19, 2013 16:15 UTC

Review: Walking cure for cash-strapped U.S. cities

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By Martin Langfield
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Many American cities, from Detroit to San Bernardino, are under financial pressure. Jeff Speck, an urban planner, has a suggestion: make them more pedestrian-friendly. His book “Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time” makes the case. Provide it, and they will come.

Apr 12, 2013 14:33 UTC

Review: Stockman polemic gloomily convincing

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By Martin Hutchinson

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

David Stockman is a polemicist. “The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America”, the new book by the former adviser to President Ronald Reagan and private equity magnate, is a tirade, arguing over more than 700 pages that crony capitalism and central planning have increasingly corrupted U.S. policy since the Franklin Roosevelt administration.

Apr 5, 2013 18:44 UTC

Review: The Robespierres of central banking

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By Dominic Elliott

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The most lasting inheritance of the 2008 financial crisis may be a change in the purpose of central banks. From the 1980s until 2007, most believed that monetary authorities should primarily use a policy interest rate to combat inflation. Interventions in the markets or in the financial system were outside the remit, or so the orthodox view went. Neil Irwin’s “The Alchemists” shows how that thinking has been turned on its head.

Mar 22, 2013 15:53 UTC

Review: Seeing through bankers’ woolly thinking

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By George Hay

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

How much capital do banks need? Ask the Basel Committee of global banking supervisors, and it will recommend 3 percent of total bank assets. Ask tougher observers like the UK’s banking commission, and you’ll hear 4 percent. But ask Anat Admati and Martin Hellwig, the economists behind The Bankers’ New Clothes, and you’re in for a shock: they’re after 30 percent.

Mar 15, 2013 17:31 UTC

Review: Bending over backwards to lean in

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By Megan Miller
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Sheryl Sandberg’s “Lean In” isn’t a self-help guide, corporate charter or memoir. The Facebook chief operating officer claims it’s not a feminist manifesto, either. It’s more of an amalgamation of all these genres. It ranges from intensely personal and insightful to didactic and methodical. Quoted research into how women measure themselves in the workplace and at home underpins a central Sandberg proposition – that women need to be more ambitious and men more accommodating.

Mar 8, 2013 15:13 UTC

Review: The massacre of Britain at Bretton Woods

By Martin Hutchinson

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Benn Steil calls his study “The Battle of Bretton Woods” but in reality the 1944 conference which created a new financial system after World War Two was more of a massacre of British interests by the U.S. Treasury’s Harry Dexter White.

COMMENT

This is viewing history with today’s perspective. 1944 was the time when the world war was at the beginning of the end. In reality Japan and Germany were defeated by the industrial and military might and resolve of the USA. Why should not Bretton Woods be skewed toward the USA, at that time in history? The world situation is certainly different now. The downfall of Bretton Woods was due to the devaluation of the dollar because of the unrestrained spending of the US government in the sixties. Emerging market countries are playing a larger global economic role and should have more input. Maybe we need a Bretton Woods II given the impacts of today’s dollar, euro, and yuan.

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Mar 1, 2013 19:18 UTC

Review: Conscious companies can revive capitalism

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By Daniel Indiviglio
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Free markets often get the blame for such troubling outcomes as inequality, corporate scandals and economic crises. In “Conscious Capitalism,” Whole Foods co-founder and co-CEO John Mackey and business professor Raj Sisodia argue that economic liberty needs a reboot.

Feb 22, 2013 12:32 UTC

Review: How economics became the hijacked science

By Olaf Storbeck

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

There’s no lack of books on the shortcomings of mainstream economics. “Economists and the Powerful”, by Norbert Haering, a German financial journalist, and Niall Douglas, an Irish IT consultant, stands out from the crowd.

Feb 15, 2013 08:00 UTC

Review: The real story of Bo Xilai’s ruin

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By Peter Thal Larsen

(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own)

Sometime in the next few months, Bo Xilai is expected to stand trial in the most high-profile political prosecution in China for over three decades. The former Chongqing party chief, once a contender to join the inner core of China’s leadership, stands accused of corruption, abuse of power and – more prosaically – “improper sexual relations” with women.