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Six years of money-printing in the United States have ended. The $4 trillion splurge may have averted a deeper slump. But for developing countries it fueled a credit binge while bringing only a fleeting boost to growth. Many will now struggle to boost output and repay the debt.

Deutsche Bank’s fixed income wager yet to pay off

The German group hasn’t yet paid all the high legal costs of past sins or satisfied future regulations. But its biggest bet is that investment banks are in a merely cyclical, not a structural, decline. Despite solid third quarter trading revenue, the case is far from proven.

Train merger could be China's ticket to elite club

Coupling together two big train-builders into a domestic monopoly sounds like a step backwards. But it would help China better compete against an oligopoly of big, rich-world rivals. For a growing superpower, that probably seems a good enough reason to bend the market norms.

Sky-high valuations no match for earnings reality

Investors knocked more than 10 pct, or well over $3 bln, off Twitter’s worth despite sales doubling. Blame the company’s overdone value multiples. Similar knocks to Amazon, Netflix, Pandora, Chipotle and Yelp show the danger when quarterly numbers can’t match a bullish story.

Rob Cox: Zuckerberg's Chinese lessons are scalable

Bilingual CEOs should be the norm, not fuel for the kind of media frenzy that greeted the Facebook founder’s Q&A in Mandarin last week. Learning a foreign language doesn’t just help conquer new markets. It fosters risk-taking and new thinking, and helps eliminate biases.

UBS' legal pain is beginning to look manageable

The Swiss bank is still paying for past sins, with a 12 month extension of a U.S. non-prosecution deal and a hefty $1.9 bln addition to legal reserves in the third quarter. But the underlying businesses are now prospering. Investors can finally eye decent returns.

Hong Kong protests reach polite impasse

The “umbrella movement” has lasted a month, confounding predictions of apathy, chaos, or a Beijing crackdown. A compromise on democratic reform is as distant as ever. Yet Hong Kong’s mostly civil activists have changed the city’s political geography for good.