Breakingviews

 
Charoen Sirivadhanabhakdi is eyeing more deals on top of the $3.3 bln his drinks-to-property group has spent this year. Investors have given a poor reception to his recent transformative acquisitions. A pick ‘n’ mix approach to public markets may explain some of the doubts.

Buffett and tax outrage both diversions in BK deal

The Sage of Omaha is lending Burger King money, at a lucrative 9 percent, but his imprint tells stock investors nothing. And contrary to social media hysteria, a new parent company in Canada isn’t going to fleece the U.S. taxman. The $11 bln purchase of Tim Hortons is just an LBO.

Why can Burger King, but not Wendy's, own Hortons?

In 2005, Bill Ackman, now BK’s No. 2 shareholder, pressured rival Wendy’s to spin off the Canadian doughnut chain - arguing it was undervalued, the synergies “minimal” and management insufficiently incentivized. Funny how a robust dose of financial engineering changes minds.

S&P 500 at 2,000 invites "new normal" thinking

A price-to-earnings ratio under 20 is only moderately above average, but U.S. earnings are at a peak relative to GDP. Adjust them to the long-term norm and the U.S. benchmark would be a third lower. Cheap money is still buoying stocks, but such new paradigms usually don’t last.

Burger King tax flip merger logic doesn't stack up

The $9.6 bln burger chain’s investors cheered its talks to buy Canadian doughnut shop Tim Hortons and move its headquarters across the border. There’s little obvious tax arbitrage, and Burger King isn’t larded with foreign cash. Inversion alone can’t justify the market’s appetite.

France's housing slump is sign of deeper woes

House prices are falling and Paris is a buyer’s market. Hollande’s clumsy policies and lower interest rates should have the opposite effect. But the seriousness of the slowdown incites households and companies to hoard cash. Only shock therapy can end the death spiral.

Court order adds urgency to India's coal crunch

The Supreme Court has ruled the practice of allocating coal mines to metal and power companies to be illegal. In the long run, transparent auctions will be better. But the verdict will force the government to find a timely solution to an acute coal shortage that may now worsen.