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Work can be seen as a blessing or a curse. In “Empty Labor,” Roland Paulsen examines people who take mostly the latter view, asking how and why they shirk, and whether it’s always a bad thing. His study of idleness on the job is enlightening, amusing and sad.

Market too bearish on European oil services

Petrofac has fared especially badly, falling 30 pct in a week. Sub-$75 oil is rattling explorers’ and producers’ nerves. As projects are shelved, oil service companies are being hurt. Share ratings reflect the pain and much depends on oil prices. But some stocks now look cheap.

Cheap oil worsens Asian debtors' lowflation woes

Sliding energy prices could make already-low Asian inflation vanish. That’s bad news for heavily indebted economies like China, South Korea, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore. If prices and wages don’t rise, borrowers will curb spending. Slowing GDP growth could stumble.

SABMiller’s Coca-Cola push is Africa buy signal

The UK brewer and the U.S. drinks giant are merging assets in southern and eastern Africa to create a soft-drinks bottler with $3 bln of sales. SAB gets control and gains market access. The move points to the continent’s strategic potential, and similar consolidation could follow.

Faulty air bags puncture Takata financial cushion

The Japanese group has set aside $660 mln to replace car parts linked to at least five deaths. Regulatory demands for a US-wide recall could double the bill. Lawsuits and fines will mean more pain. Takata’s survival may depend on the support of its customers – or the government.

Wells Fargo: first big bank simple enough to fail

The $1.6 trln lender secured a provisional stamp of approval from regulators for its living will. Less credible plans from 11 other titans suggest size isn’t the issue. Wells ranks fourth in assets and first in market cap. The real problems are complexity and interconnectedness.

Remember the UK housing bubble?

Not long ago an overheating housing market was seen by many as the big UK danger. Now mortgage approvals are dropping and house inflation is easing – even though mortgages are getting cheaper. Tighter home-loan regulation is a factor. Workers’ low earnings are the main restraint.