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The UK satellite group is paying its 39 pct shareholder Fox 4.9 bln stg for sister Sky outfits in Germany and Italy. The businesses are close already and the price looks reasonable. Sky Europe promises scale, growth, and cost savings. But leverage will soar and cash returns shrivel.

UK’s strong GDP has a soft centre

The headline - 0.8 percent second-quarter growth - sounds good. But construction shrank and industrial production was weak. Only services were strong. It sounds like a warning of future problems. Expectations of a UK interest rate rise may be delayed, leading the pound down.

Qualcomm turns from predator to prey in China

Beijing has branded the US chipmaker a monopolist, even as its dominance, which rests on smartphone chips and 3G patents, may be sliding. If that weren’t enough, some Chinese customers aren’t paying their dues. As friction over US-China spying persists, things may only get worse.

Goldman's new lead director better as chairman

The bank tapped Credit Suisse’s former client kingpin Adebayo Ogunlesi to be new lead director. Though he has never led a public company, he runs a private firm. His 30 years of investment banking experience also will come in handy. If only Goldman saw fit to call him chairman.

Murdoch calls on European outposts for Time Warner

The mogul’s Fox empire is poised to sell pay-TV arms in Italy and Germany to BSkyB, his UK satellite affiliate. There’s strategic logic to the asset shuffle and proceeds could help sweeten the $80 bln U.S. bid. How Murdoch treats many non-Murdoch owners involved is the linchpin.

Allergan bosses put money where their mouths are

The drugmaker says it’s worth more on its own than the $52 bln Valeant is offering. That’s straight from the empty-promise, takeover-defense playbook. Allergan, however, is linking stock and option grants to lofty profit goals. It’s a bolder gambit that should become an M&A norm.

StanChart at risk of "doing an HSBC" - badly

The bank has issued a knee-jerk statement attempting to quell noise about the future of its chairman and CEO. The effect is to make the board look rattled. StanChart lacks a big enough pool of realistic alternatives to repeat HSBC’s dual change in similar circumstances in 2010.