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Financial Times writer Martin Wolf’s new book is partly a cogent review of what went wrong in the 2008 crisis. But the message economists and policymakers should focus on, especially from a centrist intellectual, is that the best ideas for the future are far from the mainstream.

Global poverty needs a post-industrial definition

Criticism is mounting against the $1-a-day threshold, a legacy of industrial-age thinking that equated penury with calorie deficiency. That’s too narrow. Being unable to afford education, medication or old-age security counts as deprivation. So does exclusion from modern jobs.

Vivendi boosts shareholder credentials in GVT sale

The French media group says it favors Telefonica’s $10 bln bid for its Brazilian mobile unit. Telefonica could pay more, but it’s good that Vivendi has chosen the surest exit for shareholders. As for rival bidder Telecom Italia, it now faces an uncertain future.

Telefonica may have to inch higher for GVT

The Spanish telecom group has given Vivendi a soft deadline to accept a new 7.5 bln euro cash-and-stock offer for Brazilian subsidiary GVT. Telecom Italia’s bid is only 7 bln euros, has less cash and is more conditional. Still, Vivendi could yet wring more out of this auction.

Bland Lagarde will escape the Bretton Woods curse

The IMF chief is under investigation for signing off on a 403 million euro payout to a French tycoon. Her predecessor DSK and former World Bank boss Wolfowitz were both ousted for misconduct. Christine Lagarde, though, has few enemies. Being dull may prove her saving grace.

Snapchat's valuation soars on tech-land pixie dust

The disappearing-photo business has turned 100 mln users, chat-service demand and the $20 mln sale of a tiny equity stake into a $10 bln price tag. Trouble is, the company lacks revenue – and none is in sight. It’s another example of technology dreams trumping real economics.

Tesco should cut its dividend

Shareholders ultimately lose out when too-high payouts prevent companies from responding well to problems. Right now, Tesco needs all the financial flexibility it can muster. With a new CEO coming, the UK grocer has a window of opportunity it would be wise to climb through.