Brian's Feed
Oct 6, 2012
via Photographers' Blog

An eternity with Mitt Romney

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By Brian Snyder

Here’s something almost everyone who covers a U.S. Presidential campaign says or thinks, “That event yesterday/last week/last month seems like an eternity ago.” That’s certainly how Mitt Romney’s formal announcement of his candidacy at Scamman Farm in Stratham, New Hampshire June 2, 2011 seems.

SLIDESHOW: CHRONOLOGY OF ROMNEY’S CAMPAIGN

But that’s recent history. I was surprised when I looked into the Reuters archive and saw how far back my coverage of Romney extends:

Feb 2, 2012
via Photographers' Blog

Mitt Romney: Then and now

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By Brian Snyder

Before his campaigns to be the Republican nominee for President of the United States, Mitt Romney challenged Ted Kennedy for the U.S. Senate. While Romney ultimately lost the race against Senator Kennedy, I covered his victory rally in September 20, 1994 when he won the Republican primary.

Some things have changed since then, but much has not. Romney’s parents, who were with him onstage in 1994, have since died, and he now campaigns not only with his children, but also his grand children.

Oct 31, 2011
via Photographers' Blog

Getting on the ballot in New Hampshire

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By Brian Snyder

When New Hampshire holds its first-in-the-nation primary, there will be over 40 candidates with their names on the ballot, from at least 26 different states in the country. And the only way to have your name be among those candidates is through New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner’s office.

Getting one’s name on the ballot is relatively simple: you must meet the eligibility requirements in the U.S. Constitution Article II, Section 1, Clause 4, and pay a $1,000 fee during the official filing period.

Aug 11, 2011
via Photographers' Blog

Strange assignment: Buddhists and lobsters

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By Brian Snyder

Every story and photograph that goes out on the Reuters wire has a ‘slug,’ which is a short, one or two word way of coordinating  and categorizing pictures and stories.  For example, photographs from a Red Sox baseball game are slugged BASEBALL.   But the slug for a recent story I photographed, BUDDHISTS/LOBSTERS, combined two words I never thought I would see together.

Reporter Lauren Keiper and I recently joined a group of practicing Buddhists in Gloucester, Massachusetts for a ceremony to release over 500 lobsters back into the ocean.   The ceremony coincided with the Buddhist holiday “Chokhor Duchen” or “Wheel Turning Day.”  Buddhists believe animal liberation helps them live longer, especially when performed on holidays when they believe the consequences of their actions are multiplied.  The lobsters, which would have otherwise been headed to restaurants, were bought at a local wholesaler.

May 13, 2011

Paul says “time is right” for new White House bid

EXETER, New Hampshire (Reuters) – Representative Ron Paul, who has been called the intellectual godfather of the Tea Party, said Friday that the “time is right” for him to try once more to seize the Republican nomination for president.

Paul told an energetic audience at the town hall in Exeter, New Hampshire, that there had been a significant change in the United States in recent years in favor of personal liberty.

Nov 17, 2010
via Photographers' Blog

A “bionic” heart for rock ‘n’ roll

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I met Dan Roth in conjunction with a story being written by Reuters’ Toni Clark. Toni’s story was about a new kind of artificial heart, the LVAD (Left Ventricular Assist Device), which is implanted inside a patient’s chest. It is powered by external, rechargeable batteries connected to a cable coming out of the patient’s side, and pumps blood through the circulatory system on a continuous basis, taking over most of the heart’s work.

Dan is 23 years-old, has an LVAD implanted inside him, and is awaiting a heart transplant. All this after he had a stroke, had a defibrillator implanted in his chest and ultimately “coded” for 6 minutes.

Nov 4, 2010
via Photographers' Blog

Pitch perfect picture

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Photographing the pitcher is the bread and butter of baseball coverage, especially in the playoffs. But photographs of the pitchers are important when two of the teams’ aces face each other.

Generally, the moment you are looking for is when the ball has just left the tips of the pitcher’s fingers. But in a game where the pitchers are likely to be a big part of the story (and therefore there will likely be demand for more images of them), you need to look for other moments in their delivery that look interesting. A pitcher’s motion slowed down to a series of still images can look very strange indeed. Their limbs can look as though they have been disjointed and strange looking pieces of skin can seem to poke out. Remember too that the pitcher’s motion will look completely different from my angle as opposed to another photographer’s view farther out the baseline or closer to home plate.

Oct 26, 2010
via Photographers' Blog

Keeping it clean in the locker room

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When it’s all over, your hair is sticky with champagne and beer and your clothes are wet and smelly. Getting pulled over by the police on the way home might prove problematic. Sometimes, when you pick up your camera or lens a few days later, something doesn’t work. But being in the locker room amidst the celebrations after a sports team wins a championship is a lot of fun, at least I think so (yes, I understand if you’re questioning my sanity at this point).

The San Francisco Giants held a 3 games to 2 lead over the Philadelphia Phillies heading into Game 6 of the NLCS in Philadelphia. My assignment for the post-game, should the Giants win and clinch the series, was to cover the locker room celebrations.

Oct 8, 2009
via From Reuters.com

Audio slideshow: H1N1 vaccine rolls out

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Reuters visited the Boston Children’s Hospital Primary Care Center, where H1N1 vaccines are being offered to patients who are at least two years old and healthy.