Business Traveller

Fear of flying

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Seventy-four percent of UK citizens believe that airports and aeroplanes are vulnerable to a malicious or terrorist attack.

So finds the latest Unisys Security Index*, announced today, a global survey that seeks to provide insights into consumers’ general perception of security. Unisys says that UK public anxiety has reached its peak since they began the bi-annual review in 2007, and it is driven by concerns about terrorism, financial issues and identity theft.

According to counter-terrorism expert Neil Fisher, vice president of Global Security Solutions at Unisys, the public are right to be concerned and knee-jerk approaches to security aren’t working.

Fisher told me that the UK public’s sense of security was stable up until a year ago, even after the so-called underpants bomber, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, attempted to blow up a Northwest Airlines flight over Detroit in December 2009. Fisher is surprised in the anxiety spike since then, which seems to have increased across the board.

Why City + Airport = the Future

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United Parcel Service aircrafts are loaded with containers full of packages bound for their final destination at the UPS Worldport All Points International Hub. REUTERS/John Sommers II

United Parcel Service aircrafts are loaded with containers full of packages bound for their final destination at the UPS Worldport All Points International Hub. REUTERS/John Sommers II

It’s no longer ok to be a big city. Globalisation is Darwinian and only the hubbiest of hubs will survive. If we want best-of-the-planet goods to arrive the next morning, we must worship the airport.