Shanghai Staff Photographer
Carlos's Feed
Sep 9, 2011
via Photographers' Blog

Vacation in North Korea?

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If you are planning to take an exotic vacation, maybe Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is your place.

A week ago I joined a group of foreign journalists and a delegation of Chinese tourism agents on a trip highlighted by a cruise that left the port area of North Korea’s Rason City and headed south to the country’s famous Mont Kumgang resort. To get to the ship, we took a bus from China to a border crossing in Hunchun. Before we arrived at customs, our Chinese guides collected our mobile phones. North Korean authorities don’t allow foreigners to carry any type of mobile communications.

Aug 9, 2011
via Photographers' Blog

Fishing with film

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By Carlos Barria

In the “old” days, back before digital photography, photographers used to lug around tons of extra luggage, portable dark rooms, and set up shop in their hotel bathrooms. Or they would send their film — by motorcycle, car or even plane — to somebody else in a hotel or office close by to develop it, scan it and file. Or they might have to scramble and look for a lab in the middle of a crisis, in a foreign country. I don’t think my colleague Joe Skipper speaks Spanish, but I know that when he covered a showdown at Colombia’s Justice Ministry in the 80s, he learned how to say, “Mas amarillo!,” “More yellow!


North America chief photographer Gary Hershorn arrives to the Vancouver international airport with all his photo lab luggage. REUTERS/Stringer

Jul 23, 2011

Bulgaria, Brazil triumph as controversy boils over

JINSHAN CITY (Reuters) – Bulgaria’s Petar Stoychev and Ana Marcela Cunha of Brazil won controversial men’s and women’s 25-km open water races at the world swimming championships on Saturday with water temperatures exceeding safety guidelines.

The decision to keep racing by officials drew ire from athletes and several teams, with the U.S. team advising all of their athletes not to race when they tested the water at 0530 (2130 Friday) and finding it was 30.4 degrees Celsius.

Jul 23, 2011

Bulgaria, Brazil triumph as row boils over

JINSHAN CITY (Reuters) – Bulgaria’s Petar Stoychev and Ana Marcela Cunha of Brazil won controversial men’s and women’s 25-km open water races at the world swimming championships on Saturday with water temperatures exceeding safety guidelines.

The decision to keep racing by officials drew ire from athletes and several teams, with the U.S. team advising all of their athletes not to race when they tested the water at 0530 (2130 Friday) and finding it was 30.4 degrees Celsius.

Jul 23, 2011

Swimming – Bulgaria, Brazil triumph as row boils over

JINSHAN CITY (Reuters) – Bulgaria’s Petar Stoychev and Ana Marcela Cunha of Brazil won controversial men’s and women’s 25-km open water races at the world swimming championships on Saturday.

However, the races were overshadowed by withdrawals and complaints that the water temperature, about 90 minutes from competition host city Shanghai, was too hot.

Jul 23, 2011

Hot dip boils chances in open water race

JINSHAN CITY (Reuters) – Bulgaria’s Petar Stoychev and Ana Marcela Cunha of Brazil won controversial men’s and women’s 25-km open water races at the world swimming championships on Saturday.

The races were overshadowed somewhat by withdrawals and complaints that the water temperature, about 90 minutes from competition host city Shanghai, was too hot.

Apr 21, 2011

Clashes erupt in Shanghai as truck driver strike near port

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – A two-day strike over rising fuel prices turned violent in Shanghai on Thursday as thousands of truck drivers clashed with police, drivers said, in the latest example of simmering discontent over inflation.

About 2,000 truck drivers battled baton-wielding police at an intersection near Waigaoqiao port, Shanghai’s biggest, two drivers who were at the protest told Reuters.

Apr 12, 2011
via Photographers' Blog

Two faces of the same drama

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A year ago, I was part of the Reuters team that covered Haiti’s massive earthquake, which claimed some 250,000 lives, and left a million people living in makeshift camps. This year, I was part of the team that covered another natural disaster– the March 11 earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan’s northern coast and brought on a nuclear crisis.

The two events were very different. They occurred on opposite sides of the globe, in completely different countries, in different cultural contexts. Haiti is the poorest country in the western hemisphere, with a turbulent political history. On the other hand, Japan is one of the richest and most modern countries in the world– the third largest economy and, actually, one of the first to send help to Haiti.

Apr 30, 2010

Massive oil spill in Gulf of Mexico heads to shore

VENICE, Louisiana (Reuters) – A massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico washed up to wildlife refuges and seafood grounds on the Louisiana coast on Friday, as authorities struggled to avert what could become one of the worst U.S. ecological disasters.

With leading edges of the huge slick lapping up to outlying marshes and waterways on the fringes of the Mississippi Delta, the U.S. Coast Guard prepared protective booms along the coast in Louisiana and other at-risk states in a desperate bid to prevent oil from soiling the shore.

Mar 11, 2010
via Photographers' Blog

Slow change in Haiti

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In the weeks since I arrived in Port-au-Prince to cover the earthquake, the streets have been cleared of debris and thousands of bodies have been removed from the rubble. But in many ways, the changes seem incremental.

In Cite Soleil a small improvised camp looks a lot the same, only it’s grown in size. Thousands of families continue living under blue plastic tarps, and they receive food from aid groups fighting against time as the rainy season approaches. When I left, on March 1, the food distribution at least was much more organized, watched over by American soldiers. The food just goes to women now, in an attempt to get aid to nuclear families instead of those who shove the hardest.

    • About Carlos

      "After six years in Miami, Carlos, 31, has been assigned as photographer based in Shanghai, China. He was born in Patagonia, in the south of Argentina, and studied photography in Buenos Aires. He has covered breaking news, sports and features in the Americas, the Middle East, Iraq, and Afghanistan. In 2007 Carlos was named Photographer of the Year by Reuters."
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