Changing China

Giant on the move

Wham, Bam, Thank You Yam!

August 18, 2008

Yamaican celebrationsEver since Usain Bolt’s father Wellesley told Reuters that the “Trelawny Yam” was behind his son’s world-record breaking gold medal win in the men’s 100 metres, the Olympics has gone into a feeding frenzy over yam.

Rarely has a root vegetable enjoyed as much global interest as the previously humble Yam. So, to satisfy our readers’ craving and hunger, here are Several Things You Didn’t Know About Yam (we couldn’t think of 10).

1. Yams vary in size but some can grow to as long as 2.28 metres which is even longer than Usain Bolt himself (I think).

2. There are believed to be over 150 varieties of Yam. The most popular Jamaican variety is Yellow Yam. However Yam Laranas is not a variety of the vegetable. He is in fact a Filipino film director.

3. Every April, the Trelawny Parish, where Usain Bolt was born and raised, celebrates their root vegetable with the Trelawny Yam Festival which attracts up to 10,000 visitors.

4. “Cogito ergo spud” is Latin for “I think, therefore I Yam”

5. ‘Bat Yam’ is not a Caribbean cartoon Superhero but is a city located on Israel’s Mediterranean coast.

6. Some yam can be toxic if eaten raw. So cook it. This Jamaican lady shows you how.

If you have any more fascinating facts about yam, send em in.

PHOTO: Jamaican fans celebrate Usain Bolt of Jamaica winning the men’s Olympic 100 metres final, at a bar in downtown Beijing, August 16, 2008. REUTERS/Gil Cohen Magen

Comments

Cogito ergo spud??? hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
Fell off my seat laughing. Well done

hahahahahahahahahahahaahahahaha

Posted by Sue | Report as abusive
 

I think you should have written it in yam-bic pentametre.

Posted by jf | Report as abusive
 

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