Changing China

Giant on the move

An Unlikely Couple

November 18, 2009

Barack Obama and Chinese President Hu Jintao, arguably the world’s two most powerful men, stand shoulder to shoulder for their respective national anthems in Beijing on Tuesday.

But there are few smiles ahead of a morning of bilateral meetings on everything from the value of China’s currency to global warming. With their nations’ fates so bound to the relationship, and faced with the challenge of juggling trade and Tibet, it’s anyone’s guess what’s going through their minds.

It doesn’t help when a slightly disorientated Obama bumps into Hu’s back. But the Chinese President comes to the rescue with a gentle tug in the right direction.

“Which way are we going?” Obama asks Hu (who is not known to speak much English) as they leave their joint press briefing.

The question others may be asking is: “Who’s leading whom?”

Photo credit: David Gray

Video credit: Mark Chisholm, Jimmy Guan 

To watch the Reuters report click here

Comments

haha, that’s funny! Let’s hope Obama does not lose his “direction” in China.

 

;), “Which way are we going?”, yep that’s a “WE”:
US need China more than ever: goods, loans, “peace maker” image.
China needs US: getting paid, getting a good worldwide(and interior) image, and US “weight” for its own trades…
Most of the rest, is pure media whatever circus.

Posted by Vince | Report as abusive
 

Obama should have arrived Beijing one day earlier to rehearse this welcoming proceedings and so save himself from embarrassement in bumping Hu’s shoulder. Or the rehearsal may take place inside White House with Gary Lock prior to this trip.

Posted by Browne | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/
  •