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Sep 12, 2013

Your Money: As you ‘like’ it: Investing in the social media age

NEW YORK (Reuters) – By now, we all know what social media is best for: Instagram shots of your delicious brunch, videos of cute kittens and a twerking Miley Cyrus.

But could your Facebook and Twitter streams also be a rich mine of potential stock ideas?

Sep 12, 2013

As you ‘like’ it: Investing in the social media age

NEW YORK, Sept 12 (Reuters) – By now, we all know what
social media is best for: Instagram shots of your delicious
brunch, videos of cute kittens and a twerking Miley Cyrus.

But could your Facebook and Twitter streams also be a rich
mine of potential stock ideas?

Sep 6, 2013

Financial gurus reminisce about first jobs

NEW YORK (Reuters) – When some veterans of American finance told Reuters about their first jobs, they never expected it to become an Internet meme.

But there is obviously something inspiring about the humble beginnings of successful people, because our article (here) rocketed around the Web with the #firstjob hashtag.

Sep 6, 2013

Financial gurus reminisce about first jobs (part 2)

NEW YORK, Sept 6 (Reuters) – When some veterans of American
finance told Reuters about their first jobs, they never expected
it to become an Internet meme.

But there is obviously something inspiring about the humble
beginnings of successful people, because our article ()
rocketed around the Web with the #firstjob hashtag.

Aug 30, 2013

Tooth Fairy inflation gone wild

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Kelly Bird Pierre knew the world had changed when she heard what the Tooth Fairy was giving out these days.

The 39-year-old educator from South Orange, New Jersey used to get a quarter whenever she lost one of her own baby teeth. But when her daughter Oona and son Jacques went through the same phase, reports from their schoolyard buddies swiftly got back to her: $3, $5, even $10 a tooth.

Aug 27, 2013

Budding bulls and Buffetts: These teens dive into stocks

NEW YORK (Reuters) – As any exasperated parent will tell you, most teenagers are obsessed with highly superficial fare: TV, clothing, trips to the mall or the latest smartphone app.

Rachel Fox isn’t most teenagers.

The 17-year-old actress made 338 stock trades last year, earning 30.4 percent gains and clobbering the S&P 500. She peppers her conversation with phrases like “covered calls,” “shorts” and “double tops.”

Aug 22, 2013

Shiller’s math says the market looks expensive

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Here is a worrisome thought for all the analytical investors out there: What if all this time, you have been looking at the wrong numbers?

Consider this: When you are mulling over whether to buy a stock, you are likely to look at the price-earnings ratio, a common metric for valuing companies. A low P/E suggests that a stock is relatively cheap; a high one suggests it is richly priced.

Aug 19, 2013

Dropping out for a year, with the whole family

NEW YORK (Reuters) – At this time last year, Graham Bodel was analyzing equities for Credit Suisse in Manhattan.

This year, his days look a little different. In recent weeks he has been walking along the banks of the Seine River with his wife, Alexa, and their two children, and strolling through the Jardin du Luxembourg or the Musee d’Orsay.

Aug 16, 2013

Savers are sexy: Why thriftiness can attract a partner

NEW YORK, Aug 16 (Reuters) – In the world of dating, there
is one common assumption: That a fancy car, a pricey dress, and
a willingness to splurge are all things that will help you
impress and snare your ideal partner.

“You would think that spending would be more attractive,
because things like flashy watches or purses are so visible,”
says Jenny Olson, a PhD candidate at the University of
Michigan’s Ross School of Business and co-author of the working
paper, “A Penny Saved is a Partner Earned: The Romantic Appeal
of Savers”.

Aug 9, 2013

First jobs of finance gurus

NEW YORK (Reuters) – They may be Masters of the Universe now – but they weren’t then.

In fact, many of the nation’s foremost financial minds had distinctly humble beginnings. Berkshire Hathaway’s Warren Buffett, for instance, wasn’t always the famed Oracle of Omaha. Once he was a fresh-faced delivery boy, tossing newspapers into people’s front yards.

    • About Chris

      "Chris Taylor is an award-winning freelance writer in New York City. A former senior writer with SmartMoney, the Wall Street Journal's personal-finance magazine, he has been published in the Financial Times, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, CNBC.com, Fortune, Money, and more. He has won journalism awards from the National Press Club, the Deadline Club, and the National Association of Real Estate Editors. The opinions expressed are his own."
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