European Science Correspondent
Chris's Feed
Jul 26, 2012

Dow Chemical hard-headed about its Olympic ties

LONDON (Reuters) – While many corporate backers of the Olympics hope some of the fairy dust from the Games will rub off on their brands, Dow Chemical is taking a decidedly hard-nosed approach to its sponsorship in the face of criticism over its links with the Bhopal disaster.

“This is an investment, not a sponsorship,” George Hamilton, the Dow executive in charge of its Olympic operations told Reuters in an interview as he rejected the Bhopal criticism as “inappropriate”.

Jul 26, 2012

Dow Chemical hard-headed about its Games ties

LONDON (Reuters) – While many corporate backers of the Olympics hope some of the fairy dust from the Games will rub off on their brands, Dow Chemical is taking a decidedly hard-nosed approach to its sponsorship in the face of criticism over its links with the Bhopal disaster.

“This is an investment, not a sponsorship,” George Hamilton, the Dow executive in charge of its Olympic operations told Reuters in an interview as he rejected the Bhopal criticism as “inappropriate”.

Jul 26, 2012

Olympics-Dow Chemical hard-headed about its Games ties

LONDON, July 26 (Reuters) – While many corporate backers of
the Olympics hope some of the fairy dust from the Games will rub
off on their brands, Dow Chemical is taking a decidedly
hard-nosed approach to its sponsorship in the face of criticism
over its links with the Bhopal disaster.

“This is an investment, not a sponsorship,” George Hamilton,
the Dow executive in charge of its Olympic operations told
Reuters in an interview as he rejected the Bhopal criticism as
“inappropriate”.

Jul 24, 2012

Late night TV/computer sessions linked to depression

LONDON, July 24 (Reuters) – Sitting in front of a computer
or TV screen late into the night or leaving it on when you fall
asleep could increase your chances of becoming depressed,
according to a study by U.S. scientists.

The study, by a team of neuroscientists at Ohio State
University Medical Center partly funded by the U.S. Department
of Defense, will give screen-addicted night owls pause for
thought.

Jul 20, 2012

Biosensors: the canary in a coalmine worth $13 billion

LONDON (Reuters) – When Tony Turner started studying the arcane area of biosensors 30 years ago, the market for those devices was worth only $5 million (3.2 million pounds) a year and he used to see one research paper on the subject every two years.

Now a professor at Linkoping University in Sweden running a department dedicated to bioelectronics, Turner says a study he led at Cranfield University in Britain found the devices now generate annual sales of $13 billion and spawned 6,000 research papers last year.

Jul 19, 2012

Analysis: Biosensors – the canary in a coalmine worth $13 billion

LONDON (Reuters) – When Tony Turner started studying the arcane area of biosensors 30 years ago, the market for those devices was worth only $5 million a year and he used to see one research paper on the subject every two years.

Now a professor at Linkoping University in Sweden running a department dedicated to bioelectronics, Turner says a study he led at Cranfield University in Britain found the devices now generate annual sales of $13 billion and spawned 6,000 research papers last year.

Jul 17, 2012
Jul 17, 2012

EU Commission backs open-access science publishing

LONDON (Reuters) – The European Commission, which controls one of the world’s largest science budgets, has backed calls for free access to publicly funded research in a move that could force a major change in the business model for publishers such as Reed Elsevier.

“Taxpayers should not have to pay twice for scientific research and they need seamless access to raw data,” said Neelie Kroes, European Commission vice-president for the Digital Agenda.

Jul 16, 2012

Open access science debate shifts to EU after UK government backing

LONDON (Reuters) – The debate over free access to publicly-funded scientific research will shift to the European Commission after the UK government backed a report calling for financial support for researchers to use so-called ‘open access’ science journals.

Open access journals charge researchers a fee for publishing their research rather than the subscriptions that traditional journals charge readers.