European Science Correspondent
Chris's Feed
Jun 6, 2012

Scientists warn geoengineering may disrupt rainfall

LONDON (Reuters) – Large-scale engineering projects aimed at fighting global warming could radically reduce rainfall in Europe and North America, a team of scientists from four European countries have warned.

Geoengineering projects are controversial, even though they are largely theoretical at this point. They range from mimicking the effects of large volcanic eruptions by releasing sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere, to deploying giant mirrors in space to deflect the sun’s rays.

May 31, 2012

Paralysed rats walk again in Swiss lab study

LONDON (Reuters) – Scientists in Switzerland have restored full movement to rats paralysed by spinal cord injuries in a study that might eventually be used in people with similar injuries.

Gregoire Courtine and his team at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne saw rats with severe paralysis walking and running again after a couple of weeks following a combination of electrical and chemical stimulation of the spinal cord together with robotic support.

May 28, 2012

Insight – China rises in science, but equation may have flaws

LONDON (Reuters) – Deliang Chen started his scientific career in China in the early 1980s, part of the first generation to follow the vicious anti-intellectual years of the Cultural Revolution.

“There was a big desire to help those with degrees,” says Chen of those days. “You could become a researcher with a master’s degree. There were no PhDs.”

May 28, 2012

China rises in science, but equation may have flaws

LONDON (Reuters) – Deliang Chen started his scientific career in China in the early 1980s, part of the first generation to follow the vicious anti-intellectual years of the Cultural Revolution.

“There was a big desire to help those with degrees,” says Chen of those days. “You could become a researcher with a master’s degree. There were no PhDs.”

May 28, 2012

Giant telescope to explore far reaches of cosmos

LONDON/AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – The world’s biggest and most advanced radio telescope, capable of detecting signs of extraterrestrial life in the far reaches of the universe, will be located in South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

The decision to split the location of the $2 billion “Square Kilometre Array” followed intense lobbying by the two leading bidders, South Africa one side and a joint bid from Australia and New Zealand on the other.

May 25, 2012

Giant radio telescope gets split location

LONDON/AMSTERDAM, May 25 (Reuters) – The world’s biggest and
most advanced radio telescope, capable of detecting signs of
extraterrestrial life in the far reaches of the universe, will
be located in South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

The decision to split the location of the $2 billion “Square
Kilometre Array” followed intense lobbying by the two leading
bidders, South Africa one side and a joint bid from Australia
and New Zealand on the other.

May 25, 2012

Corrected: Decision time on site for giant radio telescope

LONDON (Reuters) – The location of a huge radio telescope strong enough to detect extraterrestrial life in the far reaches of the universe could be settled on Friday when the group in charge of the project meets in the Netherlands.

When completed in 2024 the “Square Kilometer Array” (SKA) will be made up of 3,000 dishes, each 15 meters wide, together with many more antennae, that will stretch over 3,000 km (1,864 miles).

May 24, 2012

Decision time on site for giant radio telescope

LONDON (Reuters) – The location of a huge radio telescope strong enough to detect extraterrestrial life in the far reaches of the universe could be settled on Friday when the group in charge of the project meets in the Netherlands.

When completed in 2024 the “Square Kilometre Array” (SKA) will be made up of 3,000 dishes, each 15 meters wide, together with many more antennae, that will stretch over 3,000 km (1,864 miles).

May 10, 2012

Scientists urge action on world’s biggest problems

LONDON (Reuters) – Scientists from 15 countries are calling for a better political response to the provision of water and energy to meet the challenge of feeding a world of 9 billion people within 30 years.

The joint statement by some of the world’s leading science academies was issued on Thursday ahead of the G8 summit in the United States. It is part of the annual lobbying effort aimed at focusing the attention of world leaders on issues the scientific community regards as crucial.