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Mar 29, 2011
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Glencore chair will determine governance discount

Glencore has everything in place for a possible record-breaking London float. Everything, that is, apart from an independent chairman. Leading the commodities trader’s initial public offering should be a prestigious gig. But it also represents a big corporate governance challenge. That gives the candidates some leverage over the terms on which they might accept the chairman’s role. 

To outsiders, privately-held Glencore has the look of a family business used to doing things its own way. Chief executive Ivan Glasenberg and outgoing chairman Willy Strothotte are part of the furniture. The fear is that even the toughest of corporate cookies will struggle to stamp some authority on the board. Add in the fact that Glencore is a complicated business operating in far-flung markets, and the group is in danger of being lumbered with a discount rating. A strong chairman would help reassure prospective shareholders. 

Mar 25, 2011
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Britain looks a safe haven for nuclear power

By Chris Hughes
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

LONDON — The UK is starting to look like a safe haven for nuclear power. Britain’s decision to set a floor price for electricity generated from fossil fuels is not an explicit endorsement of new reactors. But it may help tip the balance for companies contemplating investment in new capacity. It’s not obvious that Japan’s disaster has set back Britain’s nuclear ambitions very far.

Mar 4, 2011
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Glencore story is striking but not yet compelling

By Chris Hughes
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

LONDON — It feels like 2007 again over at Glencore towers in Baar. The Swiss commodities trader says earnings in the fourth quarter were $1.26 billion, just 3 percent below the quarterly average in the boom of four years ago. It looks auspicious for this year’s likely initial public offering. But the impressive financial performance isn’t in itself a guarantee that Glencore can get a float away at the $60 billion equity valuation being mooted in the market.

Feb 3, 2011
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Technology is a two-edged political sword

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

By Chris Hughes

The conventional wisdom that modern revolutions are powered by the Internet and mobile phones faces a challenge. Vodafone and other mobile networks in Egypt have found themselves instruments of the state as much as of the people. Using powers that are surprisingly common in operating licenses, the authorities sent blanket text messages without attribution, possibly creating the impression that the operator was behind them. The messages, for example, urged customers to confront what were referred to as criminals and traitors, according to one website.

Jan 10, 2011
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DuPont’s $6 bln Danisco bid looks safe

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

LONDON — M&A has resumed in 2011 with a textbook deal — DuPont’s $5.8 billion agreed cash offer for Danish enzymes group Danisco. Initially, the market got carried away with the transaction, pushing Danisco stock above the value of the U.S. chemical giant’s 665 crown-a-share offer. But expectations of a counterbid proved short lived.

Dec 20, 2010

London slides, again, because of Heathrow, again

By Chris Hughes

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) – London is sliding, again, because of Heathrow, again. The snow and ice in Europe is extreme but the situation at the region’s most important airport is still shocking. The logistical failings are bad, the customer service woeful — even for premium travellers. London must get a grip of its gateway to the global business community.

There were problems on Friday, before the snow hit in earnest. One British Airways flight with New York-bound financiers on board sat on the runway for four hours. Passengers were told that 45 planes needed de-icing, which could be done at a rate of only six to seven an hour. That was later revised two an hour. Some trucks then “ran out of fluid”. The passengers were shunted back — through passport control, even though the plane hadn’t left the ground — into a terminal full of confused travellers being told by a BA customer service rep to check the website. The internet connection, no joke here, was frozen.

Oct 6, 2010

Kerviel: the crime that really didn’t pay

– The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own –

By Chris Hughes

LONDON (Reuters Breakingviews) – French courts know the meaning of “crime doesn’t pay”. When Jerome Kerviel completes his three-year prison sentence for racking up massive derivatives losses at Societe Generale, he will face a demand to repay the 4.9 billion euros his trades cost the bank. Even with a book deal, a Hollywood movie spin-off and return to employment in the next trading boom, he stands no chance of clearing the debt. Barring a successful appeal, the affair has ruined him.

Jul 16, 2010
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Goldman and BP suffer costly reputational hangover

It’s nearly over. Wall Street bank Goldman Sachs has settled fraud allegations with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission with a $550 million slap on the wrist. BP has shown it can halt the flow of oil from its bust well in the Gulf of Mexico, giving confidence to recent research that the leak could cost the UK oil group less than $30 billion. But shareholders have paid a far heavier price for these episodes than the quantifiable damage suggests. That deficit has one obvious explanation: the cost of reputational damage.

Take Goldman. Its shares rose only modestly on Thursday’s deal with the regulator, leaving its market capitalisation at $74.8 billion, 21 percent lower than its value on April 15, the last day before the SEC filed charges. Almost half of that is attributable to the fall in global equity markets, taking the MSCI World Index as a benchmark. After backing out the paltry fine, there is $9.7 billion of value destruction to explain — 11 percent of Goldman’s value adjusted for falling markets.
It’s a similar story at BP. The group is worth 77.6 billion pounds, 36 percent less than its value before the Gulf well blew on April 20. Adjust for the fall in global markets over the course of the spill, and back out 19 billion pounds for the latest estimate of the known costs of the clean up and compensation, and there’s still 16.1 billion pounds of value destruction to account for. That is 14 percent of BP’s adjusted market value.

Jun 14, 2010
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BP escrow idea further muddies oily waters

BP escrow idea further muddies oily waters   Rationally speaking, the escrow idea is flawed. There should be no doubting BP’s intention to pay legitimate claims. Despite its other failings, the company has always had a “no quibble” attitude to this. Nor can there be any real doubt about its ability to pay — unless the U.S. administration creates massive new obligations that make bankruptcy loom larger.

Rationally speaking, the escrow idea is flawed. There should be no doubting BP’s intention to pay legitimate claims. Despite its other failings, the company has always had a “no quibble” attitude to this. Nor can there be any real doubt about its ability to pay — unless the U.S. administration creates massive new obligations that make bankruptcy loom larger.

Jun 8, 2010
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Hayward should say he’ll leave BP post-spill

The moment has arrived for Tony Hayward to call time on his career at BP. The UK oil major’s chief executive clearly does not have the credibility with shareholders, regulators or consumers to continue in his role once the Gulf of Mexico crisis is over. BP, and Hayward’s own career prospects, will be better off if he admits this simple truth today.

Hayward has made too many slips since the tragic accident on the Deepwater Horizon rig on April 20. At the lower end of the scale, he was unwise to boast of the superlative scale of BP’s response as if to suggest the company was well prepared for the disaster. Worse were comments that he “wanted his life back”, and the suggestion that the spill was a drop in the ocean.

    • About Chris

      "Chris Hughes is EMEA Editor of Reuters Breakingviews. Chris started his career as a researcher in BBC Television’s documentaries department and then became a financial journalist. He was previously Investment Banking Correspondent and Senior Corporate Reporter at the Financial Times, Financial Editor of The Independent and a companies writer at the Investors Chronicle. Chris has also worked at communications consultancy Financial Dynamics (now FTI), as an Associate Partner."
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