Christian's Feed
Apr 14, 2011

Algeria protests challenge president’s authority

ALGIERS (Reuters) – Algeria’s leaders risk losing control of a tide of strikes and protests that has been gaining momentum and outpacing the government’s attempts at reform.

Unlike the nationwide uprisings which toppled leaders in Egypt and Tunisia, Algeria’s protests are localised and have yet to turn into a national political movement.

Apr 14, 2011

Analysis: Algeria protests challenge president’s authority

ALGIERS (Reuters) – Algeria’s leaders risk losing control of a tide of strikes and protests that has been gaining momentum and outpacing the government’s attempts at reform.

Unlike the nationwide uprisings which toppled leaders in Egypt and Tunisia, Algeria’s protests are localized and have yet to turn into a national political movement.

Apr 8, 2011

Libya’s Gaddafi hunkers down for a long siege

ALGIERS (Reuters) – He has survived a revolt, Western air strikes and the defection of some of his closest aides, and now Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi is hunkering down for a long siege.

In the past few days Gaddafi’s administration has emerged from a period of paralysis and started drawing up a blueprint for how to run the country — at least the parts he still controls — while isolated by the outside world.

Apr 8, 2011

Analysis: Libya’s Gaddafi hunkers down for a long siege

ALGIERS (Reuters) – He has survived a revolt, Western air strikes and the defection of some of his closest aides, and now Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi is hunkering down for a long siege.

In the past few days Gaddafi’s administration has emerged from a period of paralysis and started drawing up a blueprint for how to run the country — at least the parts he still controls — while isolated by the outside world.

Mar 15, 2011

Sanctions and unrest are familiar turf for Gaddafi

ALGIERS (Reuters) – If Muammar Gaddafi, as now seems plausible, defeats an insurgency in the east and regains control of Libya, he is likely to resume a familiar role: that of international pariah, reliant on force to suppress unrest.

For two decades starting in the 1980s, Libya was subject to international sanctions and during the same period, Gaddafi fought off an insurgency in the east of the country.

Mar 15, 2011

Analysis – Sanctions and unrest are familiar turf for Gaddafi

ALGIERS (Reuters) – If Muammar Gaddafi, as now seems plausible, defeats an insurgency in the east and regains control of Libya, he is likely to resume a familiar role: that of international pariah, reliant on force to suppress unrest.

For two decades starting in the 1980s, Libya was subject to international sanctions and during the same period, Gaddafi fought off an insurgency in the east of the country.

Mar 14, 2011

Libyan urban warfare will blunt Gaddafi’s advance

ALGIERS (Reuters) – The difficulty Libyan forces had stamping out small numbers of rebels in the west of the country points to a long, hard and nasty fight when Muammar Gaddafi’s troops reach the main rebel stronghold of Benghazi.

Another lesson from the fighting in the west is that an internationally enforced no-fly zone will do little to halt the advance of Gaddafi’s forces because, at decisive moments, they have been beating the rebels on the ground, not from the air.

Mar 14, 2011

Analysis: Libyan urban warfare will blunt Gaddafi’s advance

ALGIERS (Reuters) – The difficulty Libyan forces had stamping out small numbers of rebels in the west of the country points to a long, hard and nasty fight when Muammar Gaddafi’s troops reach the main rebel stronghold of Benghazi.

Another lesson from the fighting in the west is that an internationally enforced no-fly zone will do little to halt the advance of Gaddafi’s forces because, at decisive moments, they have been beating the rebels on the ground, not from the air.

Mar 7, 2011

Scenarios: Where does Libya’s armed conflict go from here?

ALGIERS (Reuters) – The Libyan army is attempting to drive out loose formations of rebels opposed to Muammar Gaddafi that have seized towns along the country’s Mediterranean coast. Though facing a vastly superior armory of tanks, artillery and aircraft, the rebels are largely standing their ground, controlling vast swathes of the east.

Following are some scenarios for how the conflict could develop, and the clues that could indicate which one of them is most likely to become a reality:

Mar 7, 2011

Where does Libya’s armed conflict go from here?

ALGIERS, March 7 (Reuters) – The Libyan army is attempting
to drive out loose formations of rebels opposed to Muammar
Gaddafi that have seized towns along the country’s Mediterranean
coast. Though facing a vastly superior armoury of tanks,
artillery and aircraft, the rebels are largely standing their
ground, controlling vast swathes of the east.

Following are some scenarios for how the conflict could
develop, and the clues that could indicate which one of them is
most likely to become a reality: