Christopher Papagianis

Making sense of what comes next in Greece

By Christopher Papagianis
May 9, 2012

Analysts are scrambling to interpret the voting results from Greece’s first election since the crisis began in late 2009, hoping to accurately gauge the political risk that a new parliament in Greece will successfully (and meaningfully) renegotiate the previous austerity accords. At stake is the ongoing debt-financing support from the International Monetary Fund, European Commission and European Central Bank. Already the triumvirate has warned that it will not follow through on the next loan disbursement unless the new Greek government also follows through in detailing next month how it will achieve budgetary savings of more than 11 billion euros for 2013 and 2014.

Is Uncle Sam ever truly an investor?

By Christopher Papagianis
May 2, 2012

Last week, a debate erupted about whether the government’s massive Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) made or lost taxpayers money. Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability Timothy Massad and his colleagues at the Treasury Department argue that TARP is going to end up costing a lot less than originally expected and may even end up turning a profit for taxpayers. Breakingviews Washington columnist Daniel Indiviglio scoffs at this, arguing that TARP “looks more like a loss of at least $230 billion.”

Can Silicon Valley fix the mortgage market?

By Christopher Papagianis
April 25, 2012

Without question, the rise of social networks has been the dominant theme in Silicon Valley over the past few years. Platforms like Facebook and Twitter have inspired countless startups looking to latch on to networks to deliver new applications and services for consumers. In many ways, the glue that binds these enterprises is an advanced ability to organize and analyze the reams of user data generated by these networks or systems. Entirely new business models have emerged to try and capitalize on this improved understanding of consumer preferences and behavior.