Christopher Whalen

Housing, debt ceilings & zombie banks

August 17, 2011

In a Washington Post report this week, the Obama Administration was said to have decided to adopt a proposal to continue a major government presence in financing mortgages.  The Treasury subsequently denied this report in a statement posted by Deputy Secretary Neal S. Wolin:

Putting “trust” back in American housing finance

May 17, 2011

News reports suggest that New York prosecutors are preparing fraud charges against a number of large investment banks for defrauding insurance companies with respect to mortgage loans. These allegations and many civil claims with precisely similar predicates illustrate one of the most important aspects of the subprime financial crisis, namely the construction and collapse of the non-bank financial sector.

More debt and inflation will not create economic prosperity

May 5, 2011

“[F]or many philosophers, conflict is inevitable in politics because a government should seek both to make its people equal in wealth and opportunity and also to safeguard their liberty, but it cannot do both because people can be made equal only through serious constraints on their freedom. This is not simply a statement of the obvious fact that different people and different communities hold different values. The argument claims that even a single sensitive person cannot express, either in how he lives or how he votes, all the ideals he knows he should recognize.”

As Obama and Congress fiddle, America liquidates housing sector

March 29, 2011

Republicans in the House of Representatives are busily assembling several legislative proposals to reform the housing sector and reduce government support for the secondary market in home loans used by banks to manage their liquidity.

Everything that Americans should ask about home mortgages

October 20, 2010

Americans are discovering the concept of foreclosure and the loss of a home in a very real and disturbing way.  Despite the rhetoric from Washington and sensationalist media, the process of resolving defaulted mortgages is moving ahead, one reason why the U.S. will not be Japan.  But we have all forgotten the experiences of the 1930s when it comes to home foreclosure.