Readers’ questions for El-Erian

By Chrystia Freeland
April 1, 2011

As Chrystia threatened at the end of her interview with Mohamed El-Erian today, we’ve compiled all the questions our readers submitted via the Newsmaker blog and Twitter and e-mailed them to him. El-Erian will be flying to Europe tonight after he finishes up his business in New York, and while we do hope he gets a little sleep, we also hope he stays up long enough to answer all of your questions.  We’ll post his answers right here once we receive them.

Global Markets

Are the current “mixed signals” by the various markets similar to the ones you said were being transmitted before the financial crisis, and do you think that the current stock market trading activity signals caution, confidence or complacency? (from i8emallup)

Are the markets too complacent about potential risks to growth (disturbance in global production chains, fiscal tightening) and inflation (Japans expected demand for resourses, continued strength in China, core EMU)? (From Michael D-R)

What percentage chance exists of default by G20 & G7 governments? (from Mark Melin)

Middle East

How can the Middle East conquer corruption and power-abuse that has been inherited for generations? is there hope in the new “governments”? (From Lalla Nashta)

Would you give us your views on how Egypt shall grow economically and socially ?? (From mohamedino)

Japan

What do you think about the next steps for BOJ in the near term? (from Murad Halaiqa)

U.S. Economy

The US is approaching the end of QE2. What do you think would have been a better option? (question from GKhalifa)

Do you really feel the full faith and credit of the US Government is at risk? from (amj)

Why should the Fed permit large US banks to return the $1T in cash on their balance sheets to stockholders when several are technically insolvent now? (from triwealth)

Posted by Peter Rudegeair.

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