Chrystia Freeland

The Russians are coming — to Silicon Valley

By Chrystia Freeland
May 27, 2011

Chrystia Freeland is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are her own.

The Russians are coming. So far, the invaders are both welcome and unexpected — these aren’t the Cold War comrades who aspired to geopolitical domination or the first wave of oligarchs with their treasure chest of natural resources. These Russians propose to conquer the world’s new frontier — the Internet — and they are every bit as cocky as their forebears.

The Russians are coming — to Silicon Valley

By Chrystia Freeland
May 27, 2011

The Russians are coming. So far, the invaders are both welcome and unexpected — these aren’t the Cold War comrades who aspired to geopolitical domination or the first wave of oligarchs with their treasure chest of natural resources. These Russians propose to conquer the world’s new frontier — the Internet — and they are every bit as cocky as their forebears.

Don’t confuse DSK’s sex life with assault

By Chrystia Freeland
May 19, 2011

In the ‘‘Take Back the Night’’ marches I walked in in high school and college, one of my favorite chants was this one: ‘‘Whatever I wear, wherever I go, yes means yes and no means no.’’ That jingle was invented to popularize one of the most radical and important ideas of the second-wave feminists — that rape and promiscuity were entirely separate issues.

Are businesses adding to the common good?

By Chrystia Freeland
May 13, 2011

Roger Martin is an unlikely revolutionary: He is the dean of the Rotman School of Management, the business school at the University of Toronto, he sits on blue-chip corporate boards, and he has worked as a consultant for big, traditional companies like Procter & Gamble and General Motors. All in all, very much the résumé of a pillar of the corporate establishment. (Disclosure: I am a member of the Rotman School’s advisory board.)

Will there be a bin Laden peace dividend?

By Chrystia Freeland
May 6, 2011

Osama bin Laden is dead. Now it is time for the peace dividend. That’s a phrase you may remember from the early 1990s, when Soviet Communism, the big existential threat of the second half of the 20th century, collapsed. Today, America needs a peace dividend even more than it did 20 years ago. But cashing it in will be a challenge.

Carlyle Group’s Rubenstein is charmed by China

By Peter Rudegeair
May 4, 2011

Watch Carlyle Group co-founder David Rubenstein explain to Chrystia why there’s greater political risk in the United States than in the emerging markets; how he gets a better reception from Chinese Communist Party cadres in Beijing than his own members of Congress in Washington; how private-equity firms can help remedy the impending entitlement crisis; and how the procedure that enacts Congressional salary increases can be adopted to cut the deficit.