Chrystia Freeland

Pulitzer-winner David Rohde’s hostage experience

By Peter Rudegeair
July 1, 2011

David Rohde, the two-time Pulitzer-Prize winning foreign correspondent, is the newest member of the Reuters digital family.  He and his wife Kristen Mulvihill sat down with Chrystia at the Aspen Ideas Festival to discuss A Rope and a Prayer: A Kidnapping from Two Sides, their book about the seven months David spent in captivity Afghanistan and Pakistan.  Here’s a transcript of some of the highlights of their conversation:

Ending poverty via urban planning

By Peter Rudegeair
July 1, 2011

NYU economist Paul Romer is what Chrystia calls an “ideas entrepreneur.” He revolutionized the study of economic growth with his research on the power of ideas. He shook up the field of higher education with his company that offered online homework problems that were graded by computer. Now Romer has set out to alleviate world poverty. For his new project, Romer set up a nonprofit organization dedicated to convincing governments across the developing world that they should cede a portion of their territory to an external authority in order to create a “charter city” in which new rules would make it attractive for skilled immigrants, unskilled migrants and businesses to come and settle.

Winners and losers in the Apple economy

By Chrystia Freeland
July 1, 2011

ASPEN, COLORADO — Once upon a time, the car was the key to understanding the U.S. economy. Then it was the family home. Nowadays, it is any device created by Steven P. Jobs. Call it the Apple economy, and if you can figure out how it works, you will have a good handle on how technology and globalization are redistributing money and jobs around the world.

The super-wealthy bounce back

By Peter Rudegeair
June 30, 2011

Keith Banks is the president of U.S. Trust, the private wealth management arm of Bank of America. He stopped by the Reuters studio in Aspen to chat with Chrystia about the resurgent risk appetite among the world’s super-wealthy investors, his tripartite outlook for the global economy and the alternative asset classes that are currently in vogue. Here is a transcript of some of the highlights of their discussion:

Halfway to a lost decade

By Peter Rudegeair
June 30, 2011

At the Aspen Ideas Festival yesterday, Chrystia interviewed the iconoclastic and polymathic economist Justin Wolfers of the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. Here is a transcript of some of the highlights of their discussion:

The jobs council weighs in

By Peter Rudegeair
June 29, 2011

“Jobs! Jobs! Jobs! What can we do?” was the title of a panel Chrystia moderated at the New York Forum last week with members of President Obama’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness.  The Council has been tasked with jump-starting the U.S. labor market and recommending changes to the nation’s education and training initiatives, and each of the panelists touched on a different aspect of the Council’s findings.

America’s economy: glass half full?

By Chrystia Freeland
June 24, 2011

Is it morning in America? Or is now a time for blood, sweat, toil and tears? As the United States warms up for the presidential elections, the choice between those two narratives will be the most important decision each party makes and may determine who wins in 2012.

Hungary’s revolution and the Arab Spring

By Chrystia Freeland
June 17, 2011

BUDAPEST – Sometimes the conventional wisdom is right. The Arab Spring really is the most important political event since the 1989 revolutions in Eastern Europe. So it makes sense to find out what the East Europeans make of the uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa and to ask what they think it will take to transform the promise of these rebellions into a lasting political transformation.

Is U.S. business abandoning the middle class?

By Chrystia Freeland
June 10, 2011

The big mystery in the United States today is why the job crisis is not at the center of the political and economic debate. After all, the numbers — and the human tragedies they reflect — could not be bleaker.

Hedge funds: friends or foes?

By Chrystia Freeland
June 9, 2011

Are hedge funds malign financial firms that are exploiting and encouraging volatility? Or are they contrarian investors that lean against asset bubbles and make markets more stable? Chrystia interviewed Roger Martin of the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management and Sebastian Mallaby of the Council on Foreign Relations about the role of hedge funds in the economy, George Soros’s “gloriously schizophrenic personality,” and the lessons financial regulators can learn from the NFL commissioner: