Chrystia Freeland

The lessons of Richard Holbrooke

By Chrystia Freeland
December 17, 2010

No man is a hero to his valet. That caution seems more true today than ever. Indeed, in the age of WikiLeaks, the stubborn indelibility of e-mail, and a democratized, 24/7 cybermedia that are avid to feed what turns out to be our insatiable appetite for details of the private behavior of public figures, you could take that proverb further and say all of us now know what the valet did, and that’s why there aren’t any heroes any more.

Canadian FinMin tells Europe to follow U.S. example

By Chrystia Freeland
December 10, 2010

Canadian Finance Minister Jim Flaherty stopped by the Reuters studio this morning to chat with Chrystia about the impact of Europe’s debt crisis on Canada. He said the situation in Europe “poses a danger” and that if it gets out of control, the crisis could lead to a repeat of what happened to the financial markets in 2008. He urged the Europeans to follow the course America took in 2008 and substantially increase the amount of capital in the stabilization fund:

A consequence of globalization is polarization

By Chrystia Freeland
December 10, 2010

Chuck Schumer, the senior Democratic senator from New York, already has one of his talking points for 2012 — he plans to lambaste the Republicans for their “tax cuts for millionaires,” a reference to the right’s refusal to end the Bush tax breaks at the upper-end of the income distribution.

Nouriel Roubini sees ‘the roots of the next crisis in the current one’

By Chrystia Freeland
December 8, 2010

Nouriel Roubini is #12 on on Foreign Policy’s list of the 100 Top Global Thinkers of 2010. Over the past few years, the economist at New York University says he’s been thinking most about why financial crises occur and whey they are occurring more frequently than we have expected.

Raghuram Rajan on what makes a successful capitalist society

By Chrystia Freeland
December 7, 2010

Raghuram Rajan of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business is #26 on Foreign Policy’s list of the 100 Top Global Thinkers of 2010. His big idea is: “capitalist economies work well when everybody has access to the basic conditions they need to compete: access to education, access to health care, and access to finance.” In the absence of these conditions, Rajan argues that a capitalist society will be beset by income inequality, political frictions, and rent-seeking behaviors that subvert healthy competition. Capitalism is at its best when it creates equal opportunity:

Video: Jim Rogers, CEO Rogers Holdings

By Reuters Staff
December 7, 2010

Reuters editor-at-large Chrystia Freeland interviews international investor Jim Rogers, as part of the 2011 Reuters Investment Outlook Summit.

A tour of world currency markets with John Taylor

By Chrystia Freeland
December 6, 2010

Chrystia interviewed currency maven John Taylor this morning to kick off the Reuters 2011 Investment Outlook Summit. Taylor is the chairman and CIO of FX Concepts, the largest currency hedge fund in the world, with around $8.5 billion in assets under management.

Shaping globalization with Joseph Stiglitz

By Chrystia Freeland
December 6, 2010

Columbia University economist Joseph Stiglitz is #30 on Foreign Policy’s list of the 100 Top Global Thinkers of 2010. Stiglitz told Chrystia that his big idea is “globalization is something that has to be shaped.”

Mohamed El-Erian: A period of major global realignment

By Chrystia Freeland
December 3, 2010

Mohamed El-Erian, PIMCO’s CEO, is #45 on Foreign Policy’s list of the 100 Top Global Thinkers of 2010. He tells Chrystia that his big idea is a “recognition that we are living in a period of major global realignment.”  This rapidly changing environment favors emerging markets, which are accustomed to periods of upheaval, as well as businesses, which have the metrics and flexibility required to make quick course corrections. The developed world has been hobbled by years of inertia, he says, and is at a disadvantage in responding to these global shifts.

We need an economics-based foreign policy

By Chrystia Freeland
December 3, 2010

It is impossible not to be fascinated by the WikiLeaks release of U.S. State Department cables this week. It is a story that has everything, ranging from insight into the U.S.-Russia relationship, to salacious tidbits like Ghaddafi’s predilection for buxom Ukrainian nurses, to raising the meaty issues of free speech, the internet and a government’s need for privacy.