Chrystia Freeland

Statecraft via Twitter

By Chrystia Freeland
April 5, 2012

It turns out you can govern in 140 characters. Social media is often accused of coarsening our public discourse and of making us stupid. But some innovative public leaders are taking to their keyboards and finding that the payoff is a direct and personal connection with their communities.

Manufacturing redux

By Chrystia Freeland
March 29, 2012

Chalk one up for continental Europe’s economic architects. For the past several decades, the Anglo-Saxon consensus was that state interference in the private-sector economy was a mistake. Government bureaucrats were in no position to pick economic winners and losers – and if standing aside meant letting the forces of creative destruction sweep away entire industries, so be it.

Trickle-down consumption

By Chrystia Freeland
March 22, 2012

We know now that trickle-down economics doesn’t really work – the past decade in the United States has seen incomes at the very top soar, while the earnings of the middle class stagnated or declined. But a growing body of academic research is suggesting that this benign force’s wicked stepsister, a phenomenon two economists have dubbed ‘‘trickle-down consumption,’’ is having a powerful impact on the economy and politics of the United States.

Loose cultures and free women

By Chrystia Freeland
March 15, 2012

With hindsight, we may find that the 2016 U.S. presidential race began last week, when Hillary Rodham Clinton made a politically electrifying point. ‘‘Why extremists always focus on women remains a mystery to me,’’ she said at the Women in the World conference in New York. ‘‘But they all seem to. It doesn’t matter what country they’re in or what religion they claim. They want to control women.’’

The 1 percent recovery

By Chrystia Freeland
March 8, 2012

Forget Roman Catholics and contraception, evangelicals and Mormonism, Newt Gingrich’s three wives and even Mitt Romney’s dog. If you are struggling to understand a roller-coaster U.S. election season, described by one writer as “wackadoodle,” your Rosetta Stone should be a dry academic paper by the economist Emmanuel Saez.

Prosperity, autocracy and democracy

By Chrystia Freeland
March 2, 2012

To understand the significance of the presidential election this weekend in Russia, read a book by two U.S.-based academics that is being published this month. Why Nations Fail by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, respectively, is a wildly ambitious work that hopscotches through history and around the world to answer the very big question of why some countries get rich and others don’t.

China’s ‘Apple authoritarianism’

By Chrystia Freeland
February 24, 2012

Are we outsourcing repression to China? That is the fear driving stepped-up scrutiny of labor conditions at Foxconn, the consumer electronics maker that assembles products for a number of Western technology companies, most prominently Apple.

Former Senator Alan Simpson on Freeland File

By Chrystia Freeland
February 17, 2012

Today at 11am, Chrystia will interview Alan Simpson live on YouTube. She and the former senator will discuss the Obama administration’s proposed budget for the next fiscal year as well as his new memoir, Shooting from the Lip: The Life of Senator Al Simpson. You can watch the whole thing here:

Rich shouldn’t have to pay taxes, Santorum backer says

By Chrystia Freeland
February 17, 2012

In an age of rising income inequality, one of the big questions is what impact the growing gap will have on democracy. Francis Fukuyama worries about it in this month’s Foreign Affairs, in an essay that bears the worrying subtitle, “Can Liberal Democracy Survive the Decline of the Middle Class?” President Barack Obama, as he signaled again with his budget this week, is putting the issue at the center of his re-election campaign.

Rise of the machines

By Chrystia Freeland
February 9, 2012

If you want to get a finger-tip feel for one of the most important transformations in our world today, read The Fear Index, Robert Harris’s new thriller.