Chrystia Freeland

U.S. moderates aren’t in the middle

By Chrystia Freeland
July 6, 2012

Go to the Aspen Ideas Festival – or to any similar confab of affluent elites gathered to solve the problems of the world in luxurious, remote hamlets – and you can be sure that a dominant theme will be a lament for the vanishing political center.

The winner-take-all economy

By Peter Rudegeair
July 8, 2011

Cornell University economist Robert H. Frank sat down with Chrystia at the Aspen Ideas Festival to chat about the earnings potential of superstar dentists and world-class sopranos, the unlikelihood of an Atlas Shrugged-esque strike of the elites and Charles Darwin’s contributions to economic thought. Here’s a transcript of some of the highlights of their conversation.

The future of power

By Peter Rudegeair
July 6, 2011

 

At the Aspen Ideas Festival last week, Chrystia’s discussion of war, economics and America’s role in the world featured a who’s who of leading voices: Robert Hormats, the Undersecretary of State for Economic, Business, and Agricultural Affairs; Joseph Nye, a professor at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government; and Liaquat Ahamed, the Pulitzer-prize winning author of Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World. Here’s a transcript of some of the highlights of their conversation.

Guns vs. butter, Afghanistan edition

By Peter Rudegeair
July 6, 2011

Steve Clemons, Washington editor at large for The Atlantic, chatted with Chrystia at the Aspen Ideas Festival about the politics of the deficit debate, the 2012 presidential race, and whether the U.S. is in a trap in Afghanistan. Here’s a transcript of some of the highlights of their conversation:

Pulitzer-winner David Rohde’s hostage experience

By Peter Rudegeair
July 1, 2011

David Rohde, the two-time Pulitzer-Prize winning foreign correspondent, is the newest member of the Reuters digital family.  He and his wife Kristen Mulvihill sat down with Chrystia at the Aspen Ideas Festival to discuss A Rope and a Prayer: A Kidnapping from Two Sides, their book about the seven months David spent in captivity Afghanistan and Pakistan.  Here’s a transcript of some of the highlights of their conversation:

Ending poverty via urban planning

By Peter Rudegeair
July 1, 2011

NYU economist Paul Romer is what Chrystia calls an “ideas entrepreneur.” He revolutionized the study of economic growth with his research on the power of ideas. He shook up the field of higher education with his company that offered online homework problems that were graded by computer. Now Romer has set out to alleviate world poverty. For his new project, Romer set up a nonprofit organization dedicated to convincing governments across the developing world that they should cede a portion of their territory to an external authority in order to create a “charter city” in which new rules would make it attractive for skilled immigrants, unskilled migrants and businesses to come and settle.

The super-wealthy bounce back

By Peter Rudegeair
June 30, 2011

Keith Banks is the president of U.S. Trust, the private wealth management arm of Bank of America. He stopped by the Reuters studio in Aspen to chat with Chrystia about the resurgent risk appetite among the world’s super-wealthy investors, his tripartite outlook for the global economy and the alternative asset classes that are currently in vogue. Here is a transcript of some of the highlights of their discussion:

Halfway to a lost decade

By Peter Rudegeair
June 30, 2011

At the Aspen Ideas Festival yesterday, Chrystia interviewed the iconoclastic and polymathic economist Justin Wolfers of the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. Here is a transcript of some of the highlights of their discussion:

America’s two-speed economy

By Chrystia Freeland
July 7, 2010

A sunny July day in Aspen, Colorado, with Dvorak’s Symphony Number 8, courtesy of the Aspen Music Festival, lilting in the background, is a pretty good definition of the American dream.