Opinion

Chrystia Freeland

‘We can’t inflate our way to prosperity’

Chrystia Freeland
Oct 12, 2010 18:43 UTC

“There is no other policy tool available [besides quantitative easing],”‘ Laura Tyson, a former chairwoman of the Council of Economic Advisors, said at this morning’s Reuters/YouTube live debate on how to fix the economy. Tyson argues that additional Fed purchases of long-term bonds is the most viable way to energize the U.S. economy since a new fiscal stimulus bill is unlikely to pass Congress:

She appears alongside Glenn Hubbard, another former CEA chairman, who maintains the Fed will spend another $1 trillion to lower rates by 20 basis points. “We can’t inflate our way to prosperity,” he said.

Tyson disagrees and thinks the risk to inflation is low. She admits we have to convince the rest of the world that the U.S. has no intention to inflate away its debt.

Their conversation then turned to China. Both agree that the increasingly fiery rhetoric Washington directs toward Beijing is counterproductive and that the U.S. is better served by enacting policies to reduce its trade deficit:

HUBBARD: If [the U.S. and China] both keep beating up on each other and try to beggar our neighbor, we’ll get into a very bad place. China does have a protectionist policy. It does have a mercantilist policy. And I think focusing on those things quietly rather than from the hilltops, as the administration is doing, would be the right answer.

Stiglitz says Fed policy is competitive devaluation

Chrystia Freeland
Oct 7, 2010 16:48 UTC

U.S. monetary policy is flooding the world with cheap liquidity, Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz said at the Canadian Consulate’s “Invest in Canada” luncheon yesterday. Our current policy, he explained, acts as a competitive devaluation against emerging-market currencies. Stiglitz added that he is worried about the prospect of a currency war but conceded that there’s not anything we can do about it.

Stiglitz went on to say that what the Fed is doing is not so different from China’s interventions in the foreign-exchange markets and accused the U.S. central bank of undermining global financial market integration and only acting out of a sense of guilt:

The Fed, having created the problem in the first place, feels guilty and says, ‘We should do something to get us out of the mess.’ [...]   [Emerging markets] see this as competitive devaluation of the United States.  We say, ‘No, no.  We’re not engaged in competitive devaluation.  That’s something China does.  We don’t do those kinds of things.  We don’t manipulate our currency.  All we do is ordinary monetary policy.’  But the consequence of ordinary monetary policy is competitive devaluation.

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