Chrystia Freeland

How do middle powers fare in a winner-take-all economy?

By Chrystia Freeland
April 16, 2013

This essay was originally published in the Toronto Globe & Mail.

How should countries navigate the twin challenges of our time – globalization and the technology revolution? If that seems to be an abstract question, consider the people of Cyprus whose futures have been devastated by their country’s failure to surf those international waves, or the threat posed by North Korea and its refusal to participate in these two transformations.

A novel look at emerging market entrepreneurs

By Chrystia Freeland
April 4, 2013

If you read just one book this spring to understand how the world is changing, it should be Mohsin Hamid’s new novel, “How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.” The central theme of this funny and vivid work is familiar: the great shift in the global economy’s center of gravity from West to East.

When capital flies, but corruption stays behind

By Chrystia Freeland
March 28, 2013

One of the most important political and economic facts of this young century is that capital has been slipping the traces of the nation-state. Business is global; government is national. That mismatch is one of the big sources of tension in the world today: Whether it comes to taxes, bank regulation or immigration, the fact that money and politics no longer live in the same neighborhood makes consensus harder to achieve.

Hong Kong thriller, globalization and the campaign

By Chrystia Freeland
August 16, 2012

We all know it would be virtuous to spend more time pondering the implications of globalization and the intricacies of high finance. But these aren’t always the most enticing subjects to study, especially in the languid, fading days of August. For an easy-listening approach to two of the most important themes of our time, you could do worse than devote an evening to the film “Supercapitalist,” a new financial thriller set in Hong Kong.