Commentaries

Let the Fed regulate

November 20, 2009

By John M. Berry

John M. Berry, who has covered the economy for four decades for the Washington Post and other publications, is a guest columnist.

Has the moment passed for bank reform?

September 14, 2009

LEHMAN/A year on from the collapse of Lehman Brothers and there is plenty being written and broadcast about the lessons, the winners and losers and where we go from here.

Shock! Banker says banks must shrink

August 3, 2009

One of the most depressing, though predictable, aspects of the financial crisis has been the reluctance of senior bankers to publicly debate the industry’s shortcomings.

Shock! Banker says banks must shrink

July 30, 2009

One of the most depressing, though predictable, aspects of the financial crisis has been the reluctance of senior bankers to publicly debate the industry’s shortcomings.

Ackermann makes half-baked case for reform

July 30, 2009

In the debate about the future of financial regulation, most senior bank executives have been notable by their silence, preferring to lobby behind the scenes rather than argue their case in public.

from Margaret Doyle:

IASB sticks to its fair value guns

July 16, 2009

LONDON, July 15 (Reuters) –David Tweedie, chairman of the International Accounting Standards Board, has responded to demands that he revise the controversial standard on financial instruments by strengthening controversial “mark to market” accounting. He should be careful he does not derail progress towards global accounting standards in the process.

Defining financial stability

July 8, 2009

By my count, the British government’s new paper setting out its plans for overhauling the banking industry mentions the words “financial stability” 141 times in its 147 pages. So it comes as some surprise that the document makes no attempt to define the phrase.

from Margaret Doyle:

COLUMN –One cheer for Darling’s reform: Margaret Doyle

July 8, 2009

Margaret Doyle is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own

By Margaret Doyle

LONDON, July 8 (Reuters) – Alastair Darling has ignored the first rule of holes: if you’re in one, stop digging. He could have produced a few motherhood-and-apple pie reforms of the banking system, to give the impression of activity. Instead, he has dug in, proposing an upgrade of Britain’s failed “tripartite” system of regulation.