Commentaries

Apple-Google learn Corporate Governance 1.0

August 3, 2009

LONDON, Aug 3 (Reuters) – The resignation of Google CEO Eric Schmidt from Apple’s board should come as no surprise to anyone with an inkling of what corporate governance means.

Tech results give few clues to economy: Eric Auchard

July 27, 2009

Windows 7 touchscreen demonstrationBy Eric Auchard

LONDON, July 24 (Reuters) – Investors have proved all too ready to interpret positive earnings trends from Intel, IBM and Apple as signs of economic recovery and to justify a continued rally in technology stocks.

The hollow ring of tech earnings reports: Eric Auchard

July 17, 2009

By Eric Auchard

Morgan Stanley Hi-Tech Index year-to-dateLONDON, July 17 (Reuters) – For technology investors looking for clues to how the sector is faring, Intel Corp sent a false positive signal with its upbeat quarterly report this week. Subsequent reports from IBM, Nokia and Google show how hollow any recovery for growth stocks is proving to be. Even though the growth sector has defied the broader market sell-off in recent weeks, all the signs point to weak trading in months ahead.

Don’t read too much into Intel’s success: Eric Auchard

July 16, 2009

By Eric Auchard

Intel CEO Paul OtelliniLONDON (Reuters) – Intel Corp has cheered up investors by once again making forecasts about its financial performance. The trouble with reading too much into its rebound, however, is that this is largely due to productivity gains of its own making, rather than a broader awakening of demand.

In monopolies we love

July 15, 2009

The market is soaring today largely because chip-maker Intel reported better than expected earnings and Goldman Sachs bested even the most optimistic earnings predictions. But is it any shock that these two defacto monopolies would produce outsized earnings.

from MediaFile:

Netbook name game

June 4, 2009

Netbook is a remarkably clear and memorable terrm as far as most computer industry jargon goes. Which is why, as with any hot product category, it's hard for the computer industry to agree on exactly what it means.