Commentaries

Is BlackRock going to rule the world?

October 8, 2009

It’s amazing how well the company has positioned itself to clean up the mess left behind by the financial crisis. It already has chummy ties with the government, including the Federal Reserve which tapped it to manage and eventually liquidate toxic assets the central bank took on from AIG. It’s also the risk and analytics manager in chief for the Fed’s MBS purchasing program.

Calling all HFT victims

September 22, 2009

Now that the SEC has rebuffed my request to gather information about investor complaints about high-frequency trading, I’m calling on you for help.

Madoff verdict: The SEC is plain incompetent

September 2, 2009

A lengthy report examining the many ways the Securities and Exchange Commission botched its investigations of Bernie Madoff tells us something we already knew: the SEC can be awfully incompetent.

Turner is right to take on swollen banks

August 27, 2009

So the watchdog can bark after all. Adair Turner, chairman of Britain’s Financial Services Authority, says the financial sector has “swollen beyond its socially useful size”. That is a striking statement for any financial regulator, particularly one that counts promoting London’s financial centre as one of its goals. Identifying the problem, however, is the easy bit. Reversing decades of financial expansion will require global agreement on tough new rules, and the determination to make sure they are consistently enforced.

Investor protection, Singapore style

July 7, 2009

Who needs a whole new government agency to protect  consumers from irresponsible banks? Authorities in Singapore have taken a refreshingly straightforward approach in tackling banks deemed to have been less than scrupulous when selling structured notes dragged down by the failure of Lehman Brothers: they banned them.

Who is the Fed accountable to?

June 15, 2009

It’s pretty clear the Federal Reserve is going to emerge as the big winner in the Obama administration’s proposed overhaul of the financial regulatory system. But any grant of new powers to the Fed must come with legislation requiring greater accountabilty from the nation’s central banker.

Regulators are opaque, too

June 9, 2009

Matthew GoldsteinSo much for more transparency in the financial system.

It’s hard for regulators to demand greater transparency from Wall Street banks when they can’t even live up to their own standard of greater disclosure. A case in point is the Treasury Department’s press release touting its decision to permit “10 of the largest U.S. financial institutions” to begin repaying $68 billion in federal bailout money. The only trouble is Treasury doesn’t name any of the banks that can begin repaying money to the Troubled Asset Relief Program.