Commentaries

from Rolfe Winkler:

Lunchtime Links 12-18

December 18, 2009

(Reader note: still working on

MUST READ -- Strict framework leaves room for maneuver (Masters/Jenkins, FT) While this subject may seem a little dry, it's the Basel Committee in Switzerland that will lead the way when it comes to how banks measure capital and how much they need to have. I'll offer more detailed thoughts on this later today.

China picks European cars off scrapheap

September 17, 2009

GERMANY/Chinese carmakers are seeking to step into the gaps left by U.S. companies in Europe — but while acquisitions may give them access to badly-needed technical know-how, global brands and exposure to new markets, the question is whether they have learnt from past failures.

Saab and Volvo – made in China?

September 9, 2009

SWEDEN/At this rate it might not be long before Sweden’s once mighty Volvo and Saab car marques come with “Made in China” stamped on the chassis.

How Swedish is Saab now?

September 8, 2009

Less by the hour if there is any truth to the story in Reuters that China’s SAIC is considering funding the iconic Swedish car brand’s buy-out from GM.

Saab to Koenigsegg – another go slow GM sale

September 7, 2009

AUTOS SWEDEN KOENIGSEGGGeneral Motors doesn’t do deals in a hurry — at least when it is selling.

Chicken and Koenigsegg

June 15, 2009

I received something of a flaming at the hands of some readers for making a few gentle digs at the presumptions of Koenigsegg – a tiny Swedish sports car maker that is trying to buy Saab from General Motors. In particular, I was chided for not having done my homework before pronouncing – the implication being that I was too lazy to uncover the vast host of facts lying around out there in the public domain that would reveal even to a total dunderhead the merits and sense of this transaction.

Saab’s Phøenix moment?

June 12, 2009

Koenigsegg's boy racerThe great global automobile restructuring is throwing up some fairly unlikely bidders for some famous marques. Who would have thought Magna (who?) would end up buying Germany’s mighty Adam Opel? And who would have seen Fiat as Chrysler’s white knight?