Commentaries

Now raising intellectual capital

Should Volkswagen demand a Magna Carta?

Photo
-

GERMANY/Magna International seems to be taking seriously threats from Volkswagen to pull its business following the Canadian car parts maker’s Opel victory.

Magna’s co-CEO Donald Walker is saying that after talking to them, most of his other customers are happy that the car parts group – which along with Russian backer Sberbank is buying a 55 percent shareholding in GM’s Opel — is able to protect their technologies.

Apparently VW is still unconvinced, so Magna will “finalising the internal procedures” and will have more talks with the German carmaker.

Walker is also stressing that Magna is not looking to compete with its clients but is simply aiming to get a good return on its investment in Opel, reiterating that Magna will remain a parts company.

Can Magna keep its model juggling act with Opel?

Photo
-

OPEL/Cries from Volkswagen about pulling its business from Magna if the Canadian car parts maker ended up owning a stake in GM’s former European unit Opel ring somewhat hollow given the success Magna has had in juggling its customers’ different needs so far.

Even so, Magna is trying hard to keep its customers — which also include Toyota, Ford and BMW — happy by vowing to ringfence Opel from the rest of its business now it has won the long battle to buy GM’s former European unit.

Why the carmaker in front is cutting back

-

Good news: global car capacity is being cut by 700,000 vehicles. Bad news: the company doing the cutting is the world’s most efficient manufacturer, Toyota.

Across the world, governments are pledging money to keep local plants open, mostly plants which have no long-term future, and which are far less efficient than the production line in Japan that Toyota is closing.

  •