Commentaries

Don’t mess with Goldman

July 24, 2009

Poor Sergey Aleynikov.

The former Goldman Sachs programmer who allegedly stole some of the Wall Street firm’s top secret proprietary trading code picked the wrong firm to mess with–really. If Aleynikov had been an employee of UBS, he might only be facing a civil lawsuit right now–not federal criminal charges.

Credit Suisse pulls ahead of UBS

July 23, 2009

UBS has always looked down its nose at its cross-town rival, but Credit Suisse under Brady Dougan has turned the tables on the blue-bloods. As UBS remains mired in a potentially catastrophic legal tussle with America’s tax collectors, CS is winning market share across the board.

from Margaret Doyle:

COLUMN – Swiss guard bank secrecy: Margaret Doyle

July 9, 2009

Margaret Doyle is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own

By Margaret Doyle

LONDON, July 9 (Reuters) – The Americans are on a fishing trip. The fish they are after are big: 52,000 of their fattest fellow citizens, and they have invited the Swiss to land them. Understandably, the Swiss are not keen to haul in the net and hand over the source of much of their income.

from Alexander Smith:

Is Jefferies right to be bullish on M&A in AM?

July 7, 2009

A bull(ish) note from growing investment banking group Jefferies Putnam Lovell predicting "a steady flow of M&A activity in the global asset management industry" for the second half of 2009.

from Rolfe Winkler:

“There were no discussions on AIG”

June 26, 2009

I'm sorry I missed this CNBC interview last week with Robert Wolf, chief of UBS Investment Bank in the U.S.  There's a remarkably eye-opening sound bite.   (hat tip M. Mayer)

Goldman fills the Lehman void

June 16, 2009

Lehman’s collapse left a big whole in the world of structured products–a largely unnecessary investment vehicle that’s been all too popular in Europe and Asia. But it seems Goldman Sachs is rushing in to fill the void.

Et tu Schwab?

June 12, 2009

Discount brokerage Charles Schwab may be facing a Lehman-sized headache.

It appears some Schwab brokers were actively selling so-called structured notes–derivative-like investments–that were issued by the now bankrupt Lehman Brothers. The structured notes were pitched as principal protected, meaning investors might not make a lot of money if a strategy failed, but they wouldn’t lose their initial investment either.